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Maricopa County information

Maricopa County

Maricopa County
Maricopa County Departments: Innovation Studio;Air Quality Department;Air Quality Complaints;Burn Day Status;Dust Control Training;Emissions Inventory Unit;Permit Engineering;Permit Intake Locations & Parking Map;Public Records Requests;Self-Report Excess Emissions;Travel Reduction Program;Animal Care & Control Services;Assessor s Office;Board of Supervisors;District 2;District 3;District 4;District 5;Boards and Commissions;Air Pollution Hearing Board;Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation Board of Directors;Board of Adjustments;Board of Health;Board of Hearing Review;Building Code Advisory Board;Citizens Audit Advisory Committee;Citizens Transportation Oversight Committee;Community Development Advisory Committee;Corrections Officers Retirement Plan Local Board;County Attorney PSPRS;Flood Control Advisory Board;Floodplain Review Board;Housing Authority Advisory Committee;Industrial Development Authority BOD;Legislative Government Mall Commission;Maricopa Workforce Development Board;Parks & Recreation Advisory Commission;Planning and Zoning Commission;Ryan White Planning Council;Self-Insured Benefits Trust Fund;Self-Insured Risk Trust Fund;Sheriff s PSRS;State Board of Equalization;Transportation Advisory Board;Travel Reduction Program Task Force;Budget Office;Cave Creek Landfill Project;Clerk of the Board of Supervisors;Communications/News Room;Constables;Arcadia Biltmore;Arrowhead;Country Meadows;Desert Ridge;Downtown;Dreamy Draw;East Mesa;Encanto;Hassayampa;Highland;Ironwood;Kyrene;Manistee;Maryvale;McDowell Mountain;Moon Valley;North Mesa;North Valley;San Marcos;San Tan;South Mountain;University Lakes;West McDowell;West Mesa;White Tank;Correctional Health Services;County Attorney;County Manager;Elections Department;Emergency Management;Enterprise Technology;Environmental Services Department;Administrative Services;Main Office;Mobile Food Office;Vector Control Office & Lab;Environmental Health;Northern Regional Office;Eastern Regional Office;Western Regional Office;The Cutting Edge Program;Active Managerial Control;Industry Contacts;Mobile Food/Special Events Program;Plan Review & Construction Program;Vector Control Office & Lab;Water & Waste Management;Onsite Wastewater Systems Program;Solid Waste Program;Aquatic Health & Safety Compliance Inspections;Aquatic Health & Safety Plan Review/Construction;Subdivision & Infrastructure Program;Water/Wastewater Treatment/Reuse Program;Stormwater Program;Stormwater Quality Program;Facilities Management;Flood Control District;Finance;Government Relations;Human Resources;Wellness Works;Human Services;East Valley Career Center;West Valley Career Center;Integrated Criminal Justice Information Systems;Internal Audit;Real Estate Department;Office of the Medical Examiner;Parks & Recreation;Planning & Development;Procurement Services;Contract Compliance;Security Services;Public Defense Services;General Administration;Legal Advocate;Capital Post-Conviction Relief Office;Legal Defender;Capital Attorneys;Criminal Trial Attorneys;Juvenile Dependency/Severance Attorneys;RCC/EDC Attorneys;Public Advocate;Durango (Phoenix) Juvenile Office;Southeast (Mesa) Juvenile Office;Court Locations;Southeast Juvenile Court Center;Desert Vista Hospital - Mental Health Division;Durango (Phoenix) Court Center;Southeast Juvenile Court Center;Southeast Juvenile Office;Public Defender;Southeast (Mesa) Public Defender Office;Adult Felony;Adult Special Advocacy;Appeals/Post-Conviction Relief;Delinquency;Dependency;Juvenile Special Advocacy;Lower Court;Probate and Mental Health;Public Fiduciary;Juvenile Finance;Public Information Office;Public Health;Ryan White Part A;Disease Control;Office of Epidemiology & Data Services;Office of Preparedness & Response;Office of Community Wellness & Health Promotion;Child Care Health Consultation Program;Public Health Nursing;Office of Family Health;High Risk Perinatal Program;Nurse-Family Partnership;Maricopa County Lead Safe Partnerships;Program Operations;Office of Performance Improvement;Clinical Services;Oral Health;First Teeth First;Oral Health Tobacco Cessation Program;Ryan White Dental Insurance Program;STD / HIV Testing;HIV Surveillance Program;Tuberculosis Control & Prevention;Community Transformation;Teen Health Program;Office of Nutrition & Active Living;Ask the Registered Dietitian;Community Health Development;Food Systems;Healthy Community Design;Safe Routes to School (SRTS);Shared Use;Office of Tobacco Prevention and Cessation;Media Inquiries;Recorder s Office;Risk Management;Claims Division;Ryan White Planning Council;School Superintendent s Office;Sheriff s Office;Superior Court of Arizona;Transportation Advisory Board;Transportation Department;CADD Support;Project Information;Road Hazard;Survey;Title VI Nondiscrimination Program;ADA;Treasurer’s Office;Waste Resources & Recycling;Cave Creek Transfer Station;Hassayampa Transfer Station;Morristown Transfer Station;New River Transfer Station;Rainbow Valley Transfer Station;Maricopa County Waste Tire Scale House;Transfer Station;Justice Courts;


FAQ ( frequently asked question )


We do not charge for stray dogs; there is a $96 fee for stray cats. If you are surrendering an owned animal, there is a $75 per animal fee. For more information, visit our services and fees area. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Found Pet - Maricopa County )

f you have found an animal that has been hit by a car or has a life-threatening injury, please call the Arizona Humane Society at 602-997-7585, Ext 2073. Or, if you live in Peoria, Surprise, El Mirage, Youngtown, Avondale, Mesa, Buckeye or Wickenburg, please call your local police department. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Found Pet - Maricopa County )

Due to the large volume of animals that we take in, we are unable to tell you over the phone or by email if we have your pet in our care. As we don't want to give you wrong information, please visit both our West and East Valley Animal Care Centers every two days to look for your lost pet. You can also use our Interactive Search Tool as a resource in the search for your lost pet. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Lost Pet - Maricopa County )

By law, we are required to hold stray animals for 72 hours. This allows time for an owner to claim their lost pet. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Lost Pet - Maricopa County )

Our staff evaluates each animal and if they are physically and mentally healthy, the animals will be sent to a rescue group or put up for adoption. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Lost Pet - Maricopa County )

Our media pets are either available on the same day, or the day following when they make their appearance. If more than one person/family is interested in adopting a media pet, a drawing will be held for the adopter. You must be present to enter the drawing. Please call 602-506-PETS (7387) for more information about the specific pet and where he/she is available for adoption. Here are some of our regular media spots: Every Saturday on 3TV's "Good Morning Arizona" Every other Thursday on Arizona Midday Every Saturday on ABC 15 Mornings Every other Wednesday at the Board of Supervisors meeting on Channel 11 Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Pet Adoption - Maricopa County )

Due to the large volume of animals that we take in, we are unable to tell you over the phone or by email if we have the particular breed you are seeking. To see what animals are currently at our shelters please visit our Adoption page . Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Pet Adoption - Maricopa County )

Although all pets adopted from Maricopa County Animal Care and Control (MCACC) have had their basic vaccinations and spay/neuter surgery, we cannot guarantee the health of any adopted animal. When you adopt your dog or cat from us, we will provide you with a list of valley veterinarians who will provide a free health check within 10 days of adoption. Please check your adoption paperwork for the list and take your pet in for the checkup. Not all animal diseases have symptoms right away, but a veterinarian will be able to identify any health-related problems. Unfortunately, MCACC does not have veterinary staff available to provide medical help once a pet is adopted. If your pet is showing signs of illness, take him or her to a veterinarian for treatment. Remember, most illnesses can be easily treated if they are diagnosed early. If you wait to provide treatment for your pet, you risk your pets health and a larger vet bill. If your pet is having complications related to the spay/neuter surgery, please call us at 602-506-PETS (7387). Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Pet Adoption - Maricopa County )

Credit and debit cards, including Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

The account is needed to schedule the recurring donations. Maricopa County works hard to ensure that your personal information is safe and remains safe. Creating an account is one secure way to store your personal information so that no one has access to it. We contract with a third-party company that specializes in safeguarding personal information. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

You will start with clicking on the link to Sign Up and enter your Date of Birth in this format YYYYMMDD and your Last Name. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Your birth date is used to create a unique account number. It is not used to identify you in any way and is not used as a form of identification. (Please note you will have to scroll through the list by groups of 10 to find your birth year and then search for your birth month and birthday.) ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Once you have entered your birthdate and last name, you will create a unique User ID and Password. These are used to log back into your account.   Please note, your user ID is case sensitive. You will be asked for a hint question that only you know the answer to if you forget your password. You will then be asked for your contact information, including address, phone number and email. You must also approve the terms and conditions of MCACC’s donation policies. Once completed, your account will be created. Please safeguard the information for future reference. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

First you must enter your credit card information. There are two ways to do this. After logging in, click Add Auto Pay Rule to the far right, then select a payment method and enter your card number. Conversely, you may click the Method of Payment link on the home screen, then the Method of Payment button and then enter the credit card number. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

It’s important to set up the amount of donation you desire and frequency. Under the Auto Pay Rule link, select the amount of payment (the minimum amount is $10). Then select the date you want to start payments (by day and month) and when you want to stop payments (by day and month). Then select frequency (weekly, biweekly, monthly, quarterly, semi-annually and annually).  Include information to accept authorization/store data. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

All recurring donations have a time limitation. You will be asked to designate a specific time to donate. Once that time has passed, you will receive an email noting that the recurring donation is passing. If at any time you decide to cancel the recurring donation before the time limitation, you can simply choose to cancel your donation. Please note, if you remove the scheduled event the same day, the transaction may have already been processed. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Yes, your payment information is protected by PCI DSS. The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is the information security standard for organizations that handle branded credit cards. The PCI Standard is mandated by the card brands but administered by the Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Yes. Once you have made your donation, please email ACCDonations@Maricopa.Gov and indicate how you would like your gift to be recognized. Please make sure to include the person’s name, address and any other information you would like on the acknowledgment card. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Please contact ACCDonations@Maricopa.Gov to help with technical issues. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

When you donate online, an e-receipt will automatically be generated from noreplymcfis@maricopa.gov and emailed to the email address you have provided. If you can’t find your e-receipt, please check your spam filter. If you still can’t find the receipt, please contact ACCDonations@Maricopa.Gov for help. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Yes. Please contact us if you have questions at ACCDonations@Maricopa.Gov ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

The shelter’s EIN is 86-6000472. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Yes, but we have elected to absorb those fees in your donation. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Visit our website or call 602-506-PETS (7387) for information about events, licensing, pet adoptions and more. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Locations:  West Valley Animal Care Center, 2500 S. 27 th Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85009  East Valley Animal Care Center, 2630 W. Salado Parkway, Mesa, AZ 85201. ( Animal Care & Control - Recurring Donations - Maricopa County )

Barking dog issues are addressed through the local noise ordinances of the city or town. If you have a barking dog issue and the owner resides in an unincorporated area, you may call Maricopa County Animal Care and County (MCACC) at 602-506-7387. Please be prepared with the address of where the dog(s) reside. You must provide your full name, address and telephone number to file a complaint. Anonymous calls are not accepted. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Services & Fees - Maricopa County )

Maricopa County Animal Care and County (MCACC) does not have the legal authority to investigate animal cruelty complaints. Suspicions of animal cruelty or neglect should be reported to your local law enforcement agency. If you live in an unincorporated area of Maricopa County, call the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office at 602-876-1000. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Services & Fees - Maricopa County )

Maricopa County Animal Care and County (MCACC) does not take reports of dead dogs and cats. Citizens should contact the city where the deceased animal was found and ask for the phone number of the appropriate agency to handle dead animal pickup. Return to Animal Care & Control ( Animal Care & Control - Services & Fees - Maricopa County )

It is the mission of the Board of Supervisors and the experienced professionals at Maricopa County Animal Care and Control to not only save the lives of more animals at our shelters, but also to ensure their well-being while sheltered. MCACC seeks to create an environment that minimizes stress on animals, visitors/adopters, and staff.  The current east shelter falls short of our high standards for animal care.  Therefore, that shelter will eventually close and a new facility in the East Valley will replace it.  This new shelter will offer all services currently available at the Rio Salado location.  A timeline has not been determined, but making this change will improve the quality of care animals receive countywide as well as the experience of those who would like to adopt. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

Animal Care and Control wants to spend every dollar it gets on things that directly impact animal welfare.  Maricopa County’s East Valley campus at Baseline Road and Mesa Drive offers an ideal location for a new animal shelter because there are no land costs.  The county owns the site and there’s space available and infrastructure in place for additional services.  The campus is located off the highway (US 60) with adjacent bus routes, making it easily accessible for visitors, staff, and volunteers.  A specific site on the campus has not been chosen at this time. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

Maricopa County staff and contracted architects considered a significant remodel and expansion of the west shelter as a way to provide a best-in-class adoption experience for residents and the best possible care for animals.  During the design process, it became clear that trying to expand the existing facility would present too many obstacles to be a viable long-term solution.  These obstacles included a long construction timeline that would have caused significant disruption to animal care operations.  In the end, county leaders believe a multiple-shelter solution—so long as it includes a replacement for the current east shelter—will be better for animal welfare and the customer experience. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

Saving lives has been, and will continue to be, the primary mission of Maricopa County Animal Care and Control.  In August 2018, 96% of the more than 2,700 animals that came into our shelters were adopted or relocated.  Two years ago, the live-release rate was 84% Animal intake in Maricopa County has declined 13% every year for the last five years, creating the possibility for a different approach to animal welfare that emphasizes service and prevention, not just sheltering. Our priorities include: increasing the quality of care we provide; reducing the length of stay for animals; improving the experience for customers who want to adopt; providing more resources to reunite people with their pets; and, addressing the challenges that lead people to give up their pets in the first place. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

In 2017, the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors approved $1.8 million to study and design a possible renovation and expansion of the Durango shelter.  A little more than $300,000 of that amount has been spent to study operations at the Durango shelter.  These findings will be used as the county considers both future improvements to the Durango shelter as well as designs for the new east shelter. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

If you have questions about the future of the MASH unit, contact the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office. ( Animal Care & Control - Shelter Plans - Maricopa County )

In most cases, when applying in person at a Maricopa County Vital Registration Office you may be able to receive a certified copy of an Arizona event the same day you make an eligible application. However, there are some instances when additional time will be needed to process your request. Such instances could include but are not limited to the following examples: Requesting corrections to the certificate Providing additional factual documentation to meet eligibility requirements Need to make payment in the accepted form ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

The original birth record is maintained permanently in the state records archives. Offices of Vital Registration “issue” certified copies of these original certificates. These certified copies are official, meet all legal purposes are printed on special paper that contains a raised and embossed seal and the official registrar’s signature. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

These corrections may be requested from the State Office of Vital Records. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

The information provided at the time the birth event was recorded is the information listed on the birth certificate. This information is for statistical purposes only and it is acceptable that the address on the birth certificate is not your current address. In other words, you do not need to “correct or amend” this information. However, please make certain you provide your current mailing address on your application for certified copies if seeking to have your order mailed to you. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

For children born in hospitals, certified copies of these birth events may be available as soon as 7 business days from the date of birth. The hospital has 7 business days after the child is born to transmit the birth certificate information to our office, the Maricopa County Office of Vital Registration . Our office ensures that the filing was complete; however, if parents filed paternity paperwork at the hospital, recording the birth certificate may take up to 30 days before certified copies will be available for purchase. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

For children born at home or outside a licensed birthing facility or hospital, parents and/or licensed midwives need to register a home birth event within 7 days of the event to our office, the Maricopa County Office of Vital Registration . Our office will verify the information prior to registering this birth and preparing the certificate for certified copies. Please allow time if the birthing information provided to the Office of Vital Registration was incomplete or needs to be completed and/or verified. Our Deputy Local Registrars are also available by telephone to assist you with further questions, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at 602-506-6805. Register a Home Birth ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

You must apply for a certified copy of your child’s birth certificate with the Office of Vital Registration ; certified copies are not provided by hospitals. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

The 1st certified copy of an Arizona Birth Certificate costs $20. All additional copies are $20 each. Any documentation received from a hospital and/or a midwife are not official certified copies of the Arizona birth certificate. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

Yes, each certified copy is $20. To make a correction and receive 1 certified copy of the corrected certificate is $30. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

An Apostille is a specific authenticating certificate that is required by certain countries for establishing a live birth. In Arizona, the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office prepares this document and information is available on the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office website. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

The procedure to make changes from changing or adding a name spelling, to correcting errors in the information provided at the time of registration varies with type of change requested and how recently the certificate was filed. Please review the information on the Birth Certificate Corrections page for further details regarding the most commonly requested correction changes and review or print out the forms you may need to prepare before submitting your requests. Our Deputy Local Registrars are also available by telephone to assist you with further questions, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at 602-506-6805. Birth Certificate Corrections ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

Once a child is born with only the mother listed on the certificate, a father may be added through the correction process. If a mother is not married at the time a child is born and has not been married any time during the preceding 10 months, both biological parents must complete and file the Acknowledgement of Paternity (AOP) (PDF) packet. The parents may also establish paternity by court order. For more information about making changes or corrections to an Arizona Birth Certificate, please review the Birth Corrections page for more information. Our Deputy Local Registrars are also available by telephone to assist you with further questions, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at 602-506-6805. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

Certified copies of birth certificates are important documents and often are needed when preparing tax filings, school registrations, for benefits enrollment and other legal matters. Original certificates are held in the state archives. Arizona is a “closed” record state which means only certain parties may receive a copy of this important document. Please read the eligibility requirements tab on the Birth Certificates page for more information. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

Our offices are located valley wide and accessed easily from major highways. We are open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please arrive by 4 p.m. if you are needing to discuss a possible correction with one of our Deputy Local Registrars. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

If you need a birth certificate from a different state view the Where to Write for Vital Records page. ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

The U.S. Department of State requires a certified copy of the birth certificate of the person needing a passport AND a photocopy of that certified copy as well. Non-certified copies of birth certificates will not be accepted for passport applications. For more information, please review the 2019 U.S. Passport requirements . ( Birth Certificates - Maricopa County )

There are no known health risks from the groundwater. The groundwater is located over 600 feet below ground surface (ft bgs) and there is no exposure pathway to this water. The water is not part of the potable (drinkable) water supply. The nearest drinking water wells are over 1 mile to the southeast and are screened at a much deeper (more than 1,000 feet below ground surface) level. These are City of Phoenix wells that are regularly tested for safe drinking water parameters. ( Cave Creek Landfill - Maricopa County )

The Consent Order from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) requires that Maricopa County be responsible for monitoring and remediating the groundwater contamination, as necessary. ( Cave Creek Landfill - Maricopa County )

There are a number of monitoring wells installed as part of the characterization activities and several more in the planning phase. Locations can be seen in the "Maps & Images" section. ( Cave Creek Landfill - Maricopa County )

Yes. Maricopa County is handling this as an environmental liability claim and committed to continuing characterization and remediation activities until they are no longer needed. ( Cave Creek Landfill - Maricopa County )

No. The "tonal" alerts you receive on your cell phone are through a different system. This system will call your phone with a recorded message. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Your caller ID will show "REVERSE911CALL" as the caller, with a 480 area code. The CENS system is based in the East Valley, which is why you will see the 480 area code. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

The system is designed to leave a message on voice mail or an answering machine. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

The message is recorded at your local 911 call center. The dispatcher will record the message in the necessary languages. CENS now has text capabilities. You opt in to receiving text messages along with voice recordings. The system also has TTY capability for the hearing impaired. There is TTY detection equipment that will bypass the voice-recorded portion when a TTY or TDD is detected. If you are using a relay service. Messages will go to the relay service and sent to you via a video message. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

No, 911 should only be called when you have an emergency. The emergency notification recording will give you instructions to follow. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

The system is designed to call back if the line is busy or if there is no answer. The system will wait five minutes before a second callback is made. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Residents that add or change information for a land line phone serviced by Qwest/Century Link, Cox or other local phone companies will have the information updated within the 911 database. Residents that self register their Cell or VoIP phones will need to update their address at the Self Registration Portal. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Each notification call will be different. The primary agency handling the emergency will make the recording you will hear. It is important to follow the instructions on the recording. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

The CENS program is available to all law enforcement and fire agencies in the Maricopa Region. The Maricopa Region extends from Wickenburg to Apache Junction. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Unlike a landline phones, cell phones and VoIP phones are not part of the 911 database. You now have the option to register your cell phone or VoIP phone with the CENS system. You will only receive CENS notifications based on the address you provide when you register your cell and or VoIP phone. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

No. Las alertas "tonales" recibidas en su teléfono celular son a través de un sistema diferente. Este sistema llamará a su teléfono con un mensaje grabado. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Su identificador de llamadas mostrará "REVERSE911CALL" como la persona que llama, con un código de área 480. El sistema CENS se basa en el Valle Medio, por lo que verá el código de área 480. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

El sistema está diseñado para dejar un mensaje en el buzón de voz o un contestador automático. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

El mensaje se registra en el centro de llamadas 911 local. El despachador registrará el mensaje en los idiomas necesarios. CENS ahora tiene capacidades de texto. Se opta por recibir mensajes de texto, junto con las grabaciones de voz. El sistema también tiene la capacidad de TTY para personas con problemas de audición. Hay TTY equipo de detección que pasará por alto la parte de voz grabada cuando se detecta un TTY o TDD. Si está utilizando un servicio de retransmisión. Los mensajes irán al servicio de retransmisión y enviado a usted a través de un mensaje de vídeo. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

No, 911 sólo debe ser llamada cuando tiene una emergencia. La grabación de notificación de emergencia le dará instrucciones a seguir. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

El sistema está diseñado para volver a llamar si la línea está ocupada o si no hay respuesta. El sistema esperará cinco minutos antes de que se hizo una segunda devolución de llamada. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Los residentes que añadir o cambiar la información de un teléfono de línea terrestre atendida por Qwest/Century Link/Cox o de otras compañías telefónicas locales tendrán la información actualizada en la base de datos 911. Los residentes que se auto registren su celular o teléfonos VoIP tendrán que actualizar su dirección en el mismo registro Portal. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

Cada llamada de notificación será diferente. La agencia que maneja la emergencia hara la grabación se oye. Es importante seguir las instrucciones de la grabación. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

El programa CENS está disponible para todos los organismos policiales y de bomberos en la Región Maricopa. La Región de Maricopa se extiende desde Wickenburg a Apache Junction. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

A diferencia de los teléfonos fijos, teléfonos celulares y teléfonos de VoIP no son parte de la base de datos 911. Ahora tiene la opción de registrar su teléfono celular o teléfono VoIP con el sistema CENS. Sólo recibirá notificaciones CENS en base a la dirección que usted proporciona cuando se registra su celular o teléfono y VoIP. ( Community Emergency Notification System - Maricopa County )

A constable who is duly elected or who is appointed by the board of supervisors has the authority of a peace officer only in the performance of the constable's official duties. (A.R.S. § 22-131) ( Constables - Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Fees are posted and collected by Maricopa County Justice Courts . ( Constables - Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Most service is done within 10 days depending on the work load on a day to day basis. ( Constables - Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Go to the " Find a Precinct " page for instructions. ( Constables - Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Contact Constable Administration at 602-506-1843 ( Constables - Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Learn more about where to apply for positions by contacting the Human Resources Department Click here to contact HR Human Resources Department. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Submit applications through the Maricopa County Recruitment Tool. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Gather more information by accessing our Benefits Overview (PDF). ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Yes. To view the status of previously submitted applications with Maricopa County, simply log in to your account on the Government Jobs Website. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Applicants may receive an email notification once the application review process is complete. The notification will advise you of the application review results. You may also view the status of your application at any time by logging into your account on the Government Jobs Website. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

All communications from Maricopa County Human Resources, Employment Services Division (i.e. application review results, testing notifications, etc.) will be sent to applicants via email using the email address specified on your application. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Unfortunately, applicants do not have the ability to update their contact information for applications that have already been submitted. In order to update contact information for existing applications, please contact Employment Services at 602-506-3755. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Yes. To view or obtain a copy of your previously submitted applications with Maricopa County, log in to your account on the Government Jobs Website. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Yes. To view or obtain a copy of previous job postings that you have applied for with Maricopa County, log in to your account on the Government Jobs Website. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Yes. When creating an application, you are able to save your information and continue working on it at a later time. We must caution you that while you can start an application at any time, if you are applying for a specific position, you must submit your application prior to the recruitment closing date. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

Commonly sought positions include: - Correctional Health Technician - Licensed Practical Nurse - Mental Health Associate - Mental Health Professional - Nurse Practitioner - Physician - Physician Assistant - Psychiatrist - Psychologist - Registered Nurse ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

If you'd like to be a contractor for CHS, you must successfully pass a background check. Contractors Badges are renewed twice a year. For more information on the application process, please contact the Human Resources Department. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

We recommend viewing the current contracts, open bids, forms and requirements for contract compliance by visiting the Office of Procurement Services page. ( Correctional Health Services - Maricopa County )

An improvement district is designed to provide neighborhoods a method of accomplishing local improvements including paving, street lighting, water, sewer and parks. The improvement district allows residents to use a tax-based bond to distribute the cost of the improvements among all property owners who benefit. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

The improvement district is a resident based petition process. Visit our Steps & Procedures page for a detailed description of how to get one started. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

The total cost of the improvements is financed by issuance of improvement bonds sold through public or private sale or issued to the contractor. Once the improvements are complete, an assessment is placed on every lot/parcel within the district. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

Maintenance established by this type of improvement district shall not and cannot be terminated by its Board of Directors unless the operation and maintenance functions of the district have been taken over by an incorporated city or town. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

For further information on county improvement districts within unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, contact the Office of the Superintendent of Streets at (602) 506-0313. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

Due to current air quality standards within the non-attainment area (PM-10 boundary) and legal restrictions, only roads that have been paved to county standards will be accepted for maintenance by the County. Outside the PM-10 boundary, the county can and will form a Maintenance Improvement District. However, this requires that maintenance be performed through private contract. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

The road is graded approximately four times per year. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

If an assessment becomes delinquent, the district is obligated to sell the property covered by that assessment to pay the special assessment bonds. The buyer is required to hold the lien for a minimum of one year before applying for a Superintendent of Streets deed of the property. During that period, the assessment lien must be paid in full, plus penalties. Once a deed is issued, the buyer has control of its redemption value. For districts on the tax roll, it is considered the same as delinquent taxes. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

If you are part of an existing established development, you have the option of creating a SLID via the standard rout noted under FAQ item 2. However, if you are part of a new development, in addition to the standard route you may also wish to consider undertaking the improvements under an HOA. For further information on county improvement districts within unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, contact the Office of the Superintendent of Streets at (602) 506-0313. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

To learn what (if any) districts your property is in, visit our "Find Your Districts" page for directions on how to check your tax bill. To find out if you are in a proposed district, you can contact us at (602) 506-0313 or via our contact form. We will need your Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN) for the property. If you do not know the APN, visit our "Find Your Districts" page to learn how to find out the APN. If your subdivision name or your street name is listed in the Special District portion of the bill chances are you are in a Streetlight or Maintenance Improvement District. NOTICE: Not all districts listed in this section of the bill are organized by this office; please call the number listed in the detail for further information. Return to County Improvement Districts ( County Improvement Districts - Maricopa County )

Example answer number one ( COVID-19 Vaccine Vendor Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Example question number two ( COVID-19 Vaccine Vendor Frequently Asked Questions - Maricopa County )

Certified copies of death certified copies for Arizona death certificates are important documents and often are needed when managing wills and trusts, tax filings, amending real estate deeds, bank records, for benefits enrollment and other legal matters. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

Arizona is a “closed” records state which means only certain parties may receive a copy of this important document. State law explains that only “eligible” applicants may apply for a certified copy of this important document. This is established by providing direct proof of relationship to the Decedent and may also require establishing the applicant’s “legal or other vital interest” in the death certificate. Common examples of establishing legal or other vital interest could include the applicant being named as a beneficiary in Will or Trust or the Decedent and the applicant being named jointly on financial documents. Please read the eligibility requirements tab below for more information. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

Our offices are located valley wide and accessed easily from major highways. We are open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please arrive by 4 p.m. if you are needing to discuss a possible correction with one of our Deputy Local Registrars. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

If you are in need of a death certificate from a different state you will want to view the Where to Write for Vital Records page. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

In Arizona, a funeral home or other similar agency has up to 7 days to submit complete and accurate information regarding a death in our county. Next and in most cases, a death certificate is available approximately 3-5 business days after these events. However, certain circumstances may delay this time frame. Please contact the funeral home or other agency with whom you are communicating about this death event to learn if they have completed their filing. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

The federal government in association with the Veteran’s Affairs Office and the Social Security Administration assist eligible family members filing claims (VA or SSA) for survivor benefits and burial benefits. Eligible parties may request a special certified copy with a stamp, “For Government Use Only” for use with filing these unique government claims. These copies will not be accepted by other agencies as official certified copies. *Note: The Social Security Administration is notified electronically once someone has passed and typically no longer requires these specially stamped certified copies. Again, please know, these certificates will not be accepted by any other agency. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

In most cases, when applying in person at a Maricopa County Vital Registration Office you may be able to receive a certified copy of an Arizona event the same day you make an eligible application. However, there are some instances when additional time will be needed to process your request. Such instances could include but are not limited to the following examples:  Requesting corrections to the certificate  Providing additional factual documentation to meet eligibility requirements  Need to make payment in the accepted form ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

The procedure to make changes from changing or adding a name spelling, to correcting errors in the information provided at the time of registration varies with type of change requested and how recently the certificate was filed. Please review the information on the Death Certificate Corrections page for further details regarding the most commonly requested correction changes and review or print out the forms you may need to prepare before submitting your requests. Our Deputy Local Registrars are also available by telephone to assist you with further questions, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 602-506-6805. ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

Arizona is a “closed” records state which means only certain parties may receive a copy of this important document. State law explains that only “eligible” applicants may apply for a certified copy of this important document. This is established by providing direct proof of relationship to the Decedent and may also require establishing the applicant’s “legal or other vital interest” in the death certificate. Common examples of establishing legal or other vital interest could include the applicant being named as a beneficiary in Will or Trust or the Decedent and the applicant being named jointly on financial documents.  ( Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

- Sealants are tooth-colored coatings that fill in the grooves of back teeth. - Most tooth decay in children occurs on these teeth. - Sealants keep out food and germs that cause cavities. ( Dental Sealant Program - Maricopa County )

- Teeth that need sealants are cleaned with a toothbrush. - The sealant is painted on the tooth and quickly hardens. - Placing sealants is painless and takes only a few minutes. ( Dental Sealant Program - Maricopa County )

- All services are provided at no cost to you at your child's school. - 2nd and 6th grade students with a signed consent form may receive a dental screening. - Children without dental insurance or who have AHCCCS insurance are eligible for sealants. - All information about your child is kept confidential. ( Dental Sealant Program - Maricopa County )

An appeal is the way to ask if the court made a significant legal mistake in your case. An appeal is decided by the appeals court. The appeals court will not change your case or give you a chance to re-do your case unless the juvenile court made a significant legal mistake in your case. ( Dependency Court - Appeals - Maricopa County )

Appeals take a long time, generally at least 6 months. It is very unlikely that the court of appeals will change anything until the appeal is over, and only then if you win. For example, it is very unlikely that the court of appeals will change child custody arrangements until an appeal ends, and only then if you win. If you want an appeal, you only have 15 days from a final order to start an appeal. The notice you would like to appeal must be filed within the 15 days . Your lawyer cannot start an appeal for you until you talk to your lawyer and request an appeal after the court makes a final order. ( Dependency Court - Appeals - Maricopa County )

The appeals court checks over what happened in dependency court to see if the judge made a significant legal mistake. To do this, the appeals court looks at the legal papers and transcripts. Transcripts are written "scripts" of everything that was said in court. The appeals court will not look at anything new; the appeals court looks only at what already was done in dependency court. When the appeals court checks for a legal mistake, it asks a few specific questions: Did the court do something that the law does not allow? Did the court use the wrong law?  Did the court misunderstand the law?  Did the court make a without any evidence to support it? The appeals court views the evidence in the light most favorable to upholding the ruling of the court. The appellate court will not reweigh the evidence; instead it will see if there is any evidence to support the finding of the judge. If there was a legal mistake, the appeals court checks to see if the mistake was significant. If the case would have turned out the same even without the mistake, then the mistake is small or harmless, and nothing will change. If the mistake was large enough to change the whole case, things might change; the appeals court might vacate (undo or cancel) what the juvenile court did, or the appeals court might let the person re-do the case.  Guide to How Appeals Work. ( Dependency Court - Appeals - Maricopa County )

You can appeal within 15 days of when the court makes a final order. Final orders that can be appealed are: - Dependency adjudication - Dependency disposition - Order terminating visitation - Severance - Subsequent order ratifying or changing a child’s placement - Subsequent order reaffirming a child’s dependent status If you wait longer than 15 days, you cannot appeal. ( Dependency Court - Appeals - Maricopa County )

You are the one who decides if you want to appeal or not. ( Dependency Court - Appeals - Maricopa County )

For a list of admission requirements and our recency of education policy view the Full-Time Admission Requirements page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

For a list of the applicants responsibilities view the Full-Time Applicant Responsibilities page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

Candidate application packets will be reviewed by a selection committee and scores assigned for overall grade point average, Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) professional grade point average, DPD science grade point average, work and volunteer experience, letters of recommendation, applicant's responses in the personal statement, and second language proficiency. Grade point averages and quality and quantity of dietetic related work experience are given significant consideration. The selection committee will ask the top 25% of applicants to participate in an interview. The ability to speak a language in addition to English is beneficial to working within the local community. It is not a program requirement in the selection process. Applicants claiming proficiency in a second language may be asked to participate in that language over the course of the interview. The selection committee will rank applicants in order of preference and send the ranking to D&D Digital System for computer matching. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

View the dates for receiving a Dietetic Internship and the event details on the Full-Time Computer Matching Dates page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

Our dietetic internship is a full time, 38 week program approved for an annual class of 5 interns. Interns participating in the program will be exposed to a wide variety of nutrition services from metropolitan and rural areas of Maricopa County. Opportunities are provided to interact with individuals and groups from multi-ethnic backgrounds representing all ages and levels of education. Clinical, food and nutrition management, community and specialty experiences offered will challenge interns to integrate knowledge gained from dedicated study with opportunities for practice and application. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

The dietetic internship program begins in mid-August and is completed at the beginning of June. One week of vacation is scheduled for the week of Thanksgiving. Two weeks of vacation are scheduled near the end of December which includes Christmas and New Year's Day. Other holidays honored include Martin Luther King Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, and Veteran's Day. For a table of the program schedule view the Full-Time Program Schedule page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

Total program costs will vary according to the needs and lifestyles of each individual. Food, housing, and transportation expenses are variable and the responsibility of the student. Interns must provide their own health and professional liability insurance in order to participate in the program. Arizona law does require drivers to carry automobile insurance and Arizona residents to have annual emission inspection completed on their vehicle. For a full list of program categories and fees please view the Full-Time Program Cost page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

Candidates matched with the program will need to complete the Hepatitis B series to participate. The series should be initiated by May to allow adequate time to complete the immunizations prior to program initiation in August. For a list of the required documentation please view the Full-Time Internship Requirements page. ( Dietetic Internship Full-Time Track - Maricopa County )

Policy initiatives and nutrition services through the Arizona Nutrition Network, SNAP-Ed program Nutrition education programs for the community provided by Registered Dietitian Nutritionists Worksite and school wellness toolkits and guides A consumer nutrition email and answer line Participant-centered nutrition education, high-priority counseling, and breastfeeding peer support program for WIC participants ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

For a list of the position requirements and additional details about the internship program visit the Registered Dietitian Requirements page. ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

The mission of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health Dietetic Internship Program is "To provide a quality public health/community nutrition education program through which dietetic interns develop the skills to translate nutrition theory and knowledge into effective application and practice to meet the needs of a diverse population." Planned experience and educational opportunities of the internship will prepare program graduates to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians and enter the profession as entry-level dietetic practitioners. For a list of program goals please visit the Mission and Goals page. ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

There are four student learning outcomes for the internship program. For a list of these outcomes view the Mission, Goals & Student Learning Outcomes page . ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

For the five year period of 2011 - 2015, the first time pass rate for graduates of the Maricopa County dietetic internship program is 93%. The pass rate for graduates passing within one year of their first try for the same five year time period is 98%. ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

The Dietetic Internship at Maricopa County is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics: 120 South Riverside Plaza Suite 200 Chicago, Illinois 60606-6995 ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

Graduates of the Maricopa County Dietetic Internship will complete all program requirements. They will demonstrate achievement of the 35 core competencies and 2 public health competencies set forth by ACEND. Upon program completion, graduates will be competent to function as entry-level dietetic professionals and will receive a verification statement. ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

The Maricopa County Dietetic Internship partners with diverse practice sites throughout the county and the state. Individual interns are scheduled with clinical, food and nutrition management, community and specialty rotations based on program requirements and geographic availability. The practice site list represents current internship rotation sites. All interns are scheduled for equity in practice experiences although the sites may differ. For the complete list of practices visit the Practice Site page. ( Dietetic Internship Tracks - Maricopa County )

For a list of admission requirements and our recency of education policy for part-time women, infant, and children track view the Part-Time Admission Requirements page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

For a list of the part-time applicants responsibilities view the Part-Time Applicant Responsibilities page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

Candidate application packets will be reviewed by a selection committee and scores assigned for overall grade point average, Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) professional grade point average, DPD science grade point average, work and volunteer experience, letters of recommendation, applicant's responses in the personal statement, and second language proficiency. Grade point averages and quality and quantity of dietetic related work experience are given significant consideration. The PAL Portfolios will be reviewed for accuracy and alignment of activities to competencies. The selection committee may ask applicants to participate in an interview. The ability to speak a language in addition to English is beneficial to working within the local community. It is not a program requirement in the selection process. Applicants claiming proficiency in a second language may be asked to participate in that language over the course of the interview. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

For a list of dates for applying for a part-time internship view the Part-Time Application Timeline page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

Our Arizona Women, Infants, Children (WIC) Dietetic Internship Track, for an annual class of 6 interns, consists of 32 weeks of supervised practice with an additional 13 weeks working at the local WIC Agency. The Arizona WIC Track begins in mid-August and will be completed by the first week of July. Interns participating in this track will be exposed to a wide variety of nutrition services from metropolitan and rural areas of Arizona. Opportunities are provided to interact with individuals and groups from multi-ethnic backgrounds representing all ages and levels of education. Clinical, food and nutrition management, community and specialty experiences offered will challenge interns to integrate knowledge gained from dedicated study with opportunities for practice and application. Practice sites for the Arizona WIC Track Dietetic Internship will be determined based on the geographic location of the candidates selected and availability of rotation sites. Travel to areas around the state will be required for some rotations. Because of the great diversity among the residents in Maricopa County, interns able to speak Spanish are highly valued by the rotation sites. However, the ability to speak Spanish is not a requirement for admission into the internship program. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

The AZ WIC Dietetic Internship program begins in mid-August and is completed by the first week in July. Holidays may be honored depending on the rotation site and Local WIC Agency. These include New Year's Day, Martin Luther King Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veteran's Day, Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. For a table of the program schedule view the Part-Time Program Schedule page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

Total program costs will vary according to the needs and lifestyles of each individual. Food, housing, and transportation expenses are variable and the responsibility of the student. Interns must provide their own health and professional liability insurance in order to participate in the program. Arizona law does require drivers to carry automobile insurance and Arizona residents to have annual emission inspection completed on their vehicle. For a full list of program categories and fees please view the Part-Time Program Cost page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

Candidates matched with the program will need to complete the Hepatitis B series to participate. The series should be initiated by May to allow adequate time to complete the immunizations prior to program initiation in August. For a list of the part-time internship required documentation please view the Part-Time Internship Requirements page. ( Dietetic Internship WIC Track - Maricopa County )

For the Central Phoenix location only, contact the Medical Certification and Disposition Permit Unit. Find the Central Phoenix location. ( Disinterment / Reinterment Permit - Maricopa County )

You must have both the licensed funeral director's signature as well as the next of kin's signature. ( Disinterment / Reinterment Permit - Maricopa County )

If the death occurred prior to 2009 you will need to submit a certified copy of the death certificate in addition to the permit request. ( Disinterment / Reinterment Permit - Maricopa County )

You may submit the permit at our main office, the Central Phoenix location only. Find out Central Phoenix location. ( Disinterment / Reinterment Permit - Maricopa County )

The fax number is 602-506-6878. ( Disinterment / Reinterment Permit - Maricopa County )

Bring your pets with you when you leave. Maricopa County Animal Care and Control and the Arizona Humane Society will have temporary shelter available for your use while you are making alternate arrangements. You can also predetermine which hotels in your area accept pets, ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

Our primary way to deliver emergency information to the public is via Emergency Alert System (EAS) messages which are pushed to radio stations and television stations. Other options would include: - Wireless Emergency Alerts to cell phones - The Community Emergency Notification System (CENS), which is a recorded message sent to landlines and recorded/text message to registered cell phones/VoIP phones - Website alerts on Maricopa.gov - Social Media posts on Facebook , Twitter , and Nextdoor (via Emergency Alerts) - Our Ready Maricopa cell phone app, in which we can send out alerts. - We are also equipped with HAM radios in our EOC. ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

An emergency supply kit is intended to help you survive in the event of a disaster or large-scale emergency. Keep enough supplies in your kit to survive on your own for at least three days without electricity or running water. Keep these materials in an easily accessible, separate container or special cupboard. Indicate to your family members that these supplies are for emergencies only. A Go Bag is an extension of your emergency supply kit, containing items that you would take with you if you needed to evacuate from your home. Every family member and pet should have a Go Bag. It should be packed in a sturdy, easy-to-carry container and should be easily accessible. Find out more about what goes in each here . ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

We totally understand your concern and your need to feel informed ahead of time. The answer, unfortunately, is we don’t know those answers until First Responders (Fire Department and/or Law Enforcement) understand the hazard and the hazard area. During large-scale emergencies, First Responders size up the incident and determine if protective action measures are needed and if so what type i.e. evacuation, sheltering, etc. Each emergency varies in their scope and location, therefore, the specific instructions on where to go and what to do can vary. Factors such as wind speed, wind direction, road closures, etc. can affect which routes and/or shelter locations are available. Once the hazard is understood and projected impact area determined then First Responders will decide on the safest routes to use for evacuation and which locations to open as a shelter, if needed. If a listing of specific routes or shelter locations are pre-published, residents may ignore protective action messaging and potentially expose themselves to increased chance of danger or harm. During any emergency, you want to listen for official information and immediately follow the instructions provided by emergency response personnel.  For any potential emergency or disaster, it is important for you to have a reliable means to receive official warnings and instructions. This includes solar- crank- or battery-powered radios (in case of a power outage), television, cell phones, official government websites and social media. No matter where you are, be prepared for any type of emergency and be ready to take action this includes creating a plan for your family that can include places to meet and how to reach each other. For more information regarding Red Cross shelters and to find out which shelters are currently open visit: http://www.redcross.org/get-help/disaster-relief-and-recovery-services/find-an-open-shelter . Please note: shelters are not listed in this page unless they are open. ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

Lleve a sus mascotas con usted cuando se vaya. El Departamento de Cuidado y Control de Animales del Condado de Maricopa y la Sociedad Protectora de Animales de Arizona tendrán un refugio temporario disponible para su uso mientras hace arreglos alternativos. También puede predeterminar qué hoteles en su área aceptan mascotas. ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

Nuestra forma principal de entregar información de emergencia al público es a través de mensajes del Sistema de Alerta de Emergencia (EAS) que se envían a las estaciones de radio y televisión. Otras opciones incluyen: - Alertas inalámbricas de emergencia a teléfonos celulares - El Sistema de Notificación de Emergencia Comunitaria (CENS) , que es un mensaje grabado enviado a teléfonos fijos y un mensaje grabado o de texto a teléfonos celulares registrados y teléfonos VoIP - Alertas de sitios web en Maricopa.gov - Publicaciones en redes sociales en Facebook , Twitter y Nextdoor (a través de alertas de emergencia) - Nuestra aplicación de teléfono celular Ready Maricopa , en la que podemos enviar alertas. - También estamos equipados con radios HAM en nuestro Centro de Operaciones de Emergencia. ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

¿Qué es un botiquín de suministros de emergencia y qué es una bolsa de viaje? Un botiquín de suministros de emergencia lo ayuda a sobrevivir en caso de un desastre o emergencia. Mantenga suficientes suministros en su botiquín para sobrevivir al menos tres días sin electricidad o agua. Mantenga estos materiales en un contenedor separado de fácil acceso o en un armario especial. Indique a los miembros de su familia que estos suministros son solo para emergencias. Una bolsa de viaje es una extensión de su botiquín de suministros de emergencia, que contiene artículos que llevaría con usted si necesita evacuar su hogar. Todos los miembros de la familia y las mascotas deben tener una bolsa. Debe usar un contenedor resistente y fácil de transportar y debe ser fácilmente accesible. Obtenga más información sobre lo que incluye cada uno aquí . ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

Comprendemos totalmente su preocupación y necesidad de sentirse informado con anticipación. La respuesta, desafortunadamente, es que no conocemos esas respuestas hasta que los primeros en responder (Departamento de bomberos y / o policía) entiendan el peligro y el área de peligro. Durante emergencias a gran escala, los primeros respondedores evalúan el incidente y determinan si se necesitan medidas de protección y qué tipo, es decir, evacuación, refugio, etc. Cada emergencia es diferente en su alcance y ubicación, por lo tanto, las instrucciones específicas sobre dónde ir y qué hacer puede variar. Factores como la velocidad del viento, la dirección del viento, el cierre de carreteras, etc. pueden afectar las rutas y / o ubicaciones de refugio disponibles. Una vez que se comprende el peligro y se determina el área de impacto proyectada, los primeros respondedores decidirán las rutas más seguras para evacuación y cuales lugares abrir como refugio, si es necesario. Si se publica previamente una lista de rutas específicas o ubicaciones de refugios, los residentes pueden ignorar los mensajes de protección y exponerse a una mayor posibilidad de peligro o daño. Durante cualquier emergencia, desea escuchar la información oficial y seguir de inmediato las instrucciones proporcionadas por el personal de respuesta a emergencias.  Para cualquier posible emergencia o desastre, es importante que tenga un medio confiable para recibir advertencias e instrucciones oficiales. Esto incluye radios que funcionan con energía solar o baterías (en caso de un corte de energía), televisión, teléfonos celulares, sitios de Internet oficiales del gobierno y redes sociales. No importa dónde se encuentre, prepárese para cualquier tipo de emergencia y esté listo para tomar medidas, esto incluye crear un plan para su familia que pueda incluir lugares para reunirse y cómo comunicarse entre ellos. Para obtener más información sobre los refugios de la Cruz Roja y para averiguar qué refugios están actualmente abiertos, visite: http://www.redcross.org/get-help/disaster-relief-and-recovery-services/find-an-open-shelter. Tenga en cuenta que los refugios no se enumeran en esta página a menos que estén abiertos. ( Emergency Management Preparedness and Response - Maricopa County )

At the beginning of the year the Family Support Staff meet with families at least twice to get all of the paperwork done and get to know the family. After the first two home visits they meet with families as often as the family wants them to. This could be once a week, twice a month or every other month. It all depends on the families needs. We want to work hard with people who are motivated to get ahead in life and get their families out of poverty. Family Support Staff are required to do at least three Home Visits with each family throughout the year. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

- The Family Support Staff are usually one of the first people you see from Head Start. They start out the year with your family and get to know who you are and how they might be able to help you. They also set up a time for your first Home Visit with your child’s teacher. - Head Start recommends that all families participate in the family partnership process. Family Support Staff will set up a time with you in September or October to do the Family Partnership Agreement. - Family Support Staff are recommended to make monthly phone calls to each family to review goals and see if there are any changes in your family situation and to see if there is any way they can help out. - They may call if your child is absent to see how they can help. - The Family Support Staff also have a section in your monthly classroom newsletter. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

A visit can take place at your child’s center, at your home, or at a neutral location. During the visit, your Family Support Staff can assist you with setting goals for your family and provide you with resources to help you accomplish your goals. If you have requested information from them they and will make sure you received what you needed and were happy with the services provided. Any concerns or questions may be addressed at this time. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

If you need additional resources, you may contact your Family Support Staff at any time. They have resources available on a variety of topics, including but not limited to: budgeting, credit card debit reduction, taxes, basic needs, health and safety, education/employment, parenting, child development, family concerns, individual adult needs, pregnancy/infant care. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

Family Services Support Head Start families and encourage success in achieving their goals. Family Support Staff assist and support families by providing resources and information for local resources. Family Support Staff work in partnership with the family and encourage them to set goals towards being self sufficient. Head Start strives to empower families towards greater confidence, self-reliance, and independence to seek out necessary resources, thus becoming their family’s own advocate. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

The Family Partnership Agreement is a tool that families and Head Start staff use to help families to be working towards self sufficiency. Families and Head Start staff work together to set family goals and make plans to reach those goals. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

It is part of the family support staff job to help your family find target areas to help get you on your way to self sufficiency. In order to do this they need to know about your income and living situation. Any information you share with them is confidential and they respect your privacy. If you are not comfortable sharing something with them please just tell them you do not want to discuss that issue. The information is also used to monitor how the program is doing in assisting families we serve and how we can improve. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

The Family Support Staff are assigned to each family to provide support and resources. Staff is available to assist families in a number of situations including setting goals. Goal can be big or small and are developed by the family to get them where they want to go. Goals can include; budgeting, repairing credit or setting up a bank account. They can also include things like education or finding or getting better employment, transportation or getting your license so you can stay in school or at work. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

Goals give us direction to see our way out of poverty. We have found that families who set goals with the Family Support Staff and have some additional support have a better chance of achieving those goals. Family Support Staff act as a cheerleader for your family and celebrate your successes as you achieve them. ( Family Support - Maricopa County )

Certified copies of Births Resulting in Stillbirth and Fetal Death Certificates are important family records. Original records are held in the state archives. ( Fetal Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

Our offices are located valley wide and accessed easily from major highways. We are open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please arrive by 4 p.m. so we may best serve you. If you need to discuss a possible correction, please visit our Central Phoenix office only and speak with one of our Deputy Local Registrars. ( Fetal Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

If you are a parent and wish to make a correction to your child’s fetal death certificate, please call or visit our Central Phoenix office and speak with one of our Deputy Local Registrars about the process. We are available at 602-506-6805 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to assist you. If visiting our office to make the correction, please arrive by 4 p.m. so we may best serve you. ( Fetal Death Certificates - Maricopa County )

When a Fetal Death certificate has been created in Electronic Fetal Death System (EFDRS), the Funeral Home is required to request a Disposition Transit Permit from Maricopa Office of Vital Registration electronically through EFDRS. ( Fetal Death Permit - Maricopa County )

For a step by step instructional training, please review the training entitled, Request a Fetal Disposition-Transit Permit (PDF). ( Fetal Death Permit - Maricopa County )

A Unlinked Fetal Loss Permit should only be created for a fetal death event that is less than 20 weeks gestation and weighs less than 350 grams. ( Fetal Death Permit - Maricopa County )

From VSIMS, select “Cremation”, leave the “Method of Disposition” field blank and check “Cremation” in the checkbox seen in the right side of the screen. ( Fetal Death Permit - Maricopa County )

If the permit has not been assigned a permit number (e.g. been “issued”) from EFDRS, locate the record within EFDRS and update the information. Once the information is accurate then resubmit the ‘fixed’ permit for approval and a number to be issued. However, if a permit number has already been” issued” you will need to call our Disposition Transit Permit Coordinator at 602-372-0535 and request to delete the inaccurate permit. If the Maricopa Office of Vital Registration staff are unavailable, please leave a detailed voicemail with the your name, facility you are calling from, the child’s name and their date of delivery, the permit number that needs to be deleted, and the reason you are requesting the deletion. ( Fetal Death Permit - Maricopa County )

Flood insurance is mandatory if your home or property is within a special flood hazard area, as designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps, and you have a federally-backed or federally-insured mortgage. Your flood insurance policy provides coverage caused by flooding for your residence since your homeowner’s insurance policy does not cover losses caused by flooding. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance - Maricopa County )

Flood Insurance can be purchased from the insurance agent who administers your homeowner’s insurance policy, any insurance company, or by visiting the FloodSmart website . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance - Maricopa County )

Typically, mandatory flood insurance is not required if your residence is located in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Zone X, although your mortgage company may require you to have flood insurance if they believe there is a risk to your residence and they want to protect their interest. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance - Maricopa County )

This is incorrect! All residences are eligible for flood insurance even if they are located in a moderate-to-low risk flood areas, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Zone X. Contact the agent that administers your homeowner’s insurance policy to learn more or visit the FloodSmart website to get a list of insurance agents. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance - Maricopa County )

Definitions of FEMA flood zones are located in the Floodplain Regulations for Maricopa County (Article Two Section 205) or refer to FEMA's website for more information on the different flood zones. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance - Maricopa County )

Flood insurance is mandatory if your home or property is within a special flood hazard area, as designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps, and you have a federally-backed or federally-insured mortgage. Your flood insurance policy provides coverage caused by flooding for your residence since your homeowner’s insurance policy does not cover losses caused by flooding. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance (Español) - Maricopa County )

Typically, mandatory flood insurance is not required if your residence is located in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Zone X, although your mortgage company may require you to have flood insurance if they believe there is a risk to your residence and they want to protect their interest. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance (Español) - Maricopa County )

Definitions of FEMA flood zones are located in the Floodplain Regulations for Maricopa County (Article Two Section 205) or refer to FEMA's website for more information on the different flood zones. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Flood Insurance (Español) - Maricopa County )

The Cities of: - Buckeye - Chandler - El Mirage - Litchfield Park - Mesa - Surprise - Tolleson The Towns of: - Carefree - Cave Creek - Gila Bend - Guadalupe - Queen Creek - Wickenburg - Youngtown Contact other cities directly for floodplain management in their jurisdiction. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

Please contact the District at 602-506-2419 for more information regarding the process and requirements for submission of a Letter of Map Change (LOMC) request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). A LOMC is for a formal determination of the property’s location and/or elevation relative to the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

The District may have a record of the Elevation Certificate if the structure is located in the unincorporated areas of Maricopa County and if one was required when the structure was built. Residences constructed prior to being mapped into a high-risk flood zone typically may not have an Elevation Certificate on file. Please contact the District at 602-506-2419. If you are not located in the unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, contact the jurisdiction in which the structure is located to inquire about record of the Elevation Certificate. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

For new or existing structures that were recently identified as being in a floodplain, an Elevation Certificate is typically completed by a registered land surveyor or engineer. However a homeowner or representative may complete the Elevation Certificate for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Zones AO and A without a base flood elevation. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

An Elevation Certificate can range from $400 - $1,000 depending on the complexity of the job. Please contact a qualified land surveyor or engineer to prepare the Elevation Certificate. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

The District will provide a copy of an Elevation Certificate at no cost if we have a one on record. Note: the Elevation Certificate is the responsibility of the owner who initially builds the structure and it is used to show compliance with the approved site plan and to provide documentation for obtaining flood insurance. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

Please complete the Flood Hazard Information Request so that we can send you a detailed report about your property. You can also view the our Floodplain Viewer to assist with determining if your property is located in a 100-year floodplain. If your property is located in a jurisdiction that the District does not perform floodplain management duties for, you may be referred to the appropriate jurisdiction for more information. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains - Maricopa County )

The Cities of: - Buckeye - Chandler - El Mirage - Litchfield Park - Mesa - Surprise - Tolleson The Towns of: - Carefree - Cave Creek - Gila Bend - Guadalupe - Queen Creek - Wickenburg - Youngtown Contact other cities directly for floodplain management in their jurisdiction. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please contact the District at 602-506-2419 for more information regarding the process and requirements for submission of a Letter of Map Change (LOMC) request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). A LOMC is for a formal determination of the property’s location and/or elevation relative to the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

The District may have a record of the Elevation Certificate if the structure is located in the unincorporated areas of Maricopa County and if one was required when the structure was built. Residences constructed prior to being mapped into a high-risk flood zone typically may not have an Elevation Certificate on file. Please contact the District at 602-506-2419. If you are not located in the unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, contact the jurisdiction in which the structure is located to inquire about record of the Elevation Certificate. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

For new or existing structures that were recently identified as being in a floodplain, an Elevation Certificate is typically completed by a registered land surveyor or engineer. However a homeowner or representative may complete the Elevation Certificate for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Zones AO and A without a base flood elevation. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

An Elevation Certificate can range from $400 - $1,000 depending on the complexity of the job. Please contact a qualified land surveyor or engineer to prepare the Elevation Certificate. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

The District will provide a copy of an Elevation Certificate at no cost if we have a one on record. Note: the Elevation Certificate is the responsibility of the owner who initially builds the structure and it is used to show compliance with the approved site plan and to provide documentation for obtaining flood insurance. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please complete the Flood Hazard Information Request so that we can send you a detailed report about your property. You can also view the Floodplain Viewer to assist with determining if your property is located in a 100-year floodplain. If your property is located in a jurisdiction that the District does not perform floodplain management duties for, you may be referred to the appropriate jurisdiction for more information. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Floodplains (Español) - Maricopa County )

The District is a political subdivision of the state of Arizona. The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors serves as the District's Board of Directors, which in turn receives counsel from the Flood Control Advisory Board comprised of County citizens. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General - Maricopa County )

A secondary property tax paid by Maricopa County property owners provides the District's primary funding. The District seeks financial project partnerships from Federal, state and local agencies to supplement tax revenue. Other revenue sources include sales of excess land and other assets, permitting fees, and fund balance interest. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General - Maricopa County )

The Flood Control District of Maricopa County performs floodplain management for the following cities & towns:  Buckeye  Carefree Cave Creek Chandler  El Mirage Gila Bend Guadalupe Litchfield Park  Mesa  Queen Creek Surprise  Tolleson Wickenburg Youngtown Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General - Maricopa County )

The following cities & towns conduct their own floodplain management. Contact them directly regarding floodplain questions at the phone numbers below: City of Avondale (623) 333-4218 Town of Fountain Hills (480) 816-5100 Town of Gilbert (480) 503-6815 City of Glendale (623) 930-3656 City of Goodyear (623) 882-7979 Town of Paradise Valley (480) 348-3693 City of Peoria (623) 773-7210 City of Phoenix (602) 262-4960 City of Scottsdale (480) 312-2356 City of Tempe (480) 350-8288 All other cities & towns contact the Flood Control District at (602) 506-1501 Citizens in unincorporated Maricopa County should contact the Department of Planning and Development regarding floodplain regulation and permits. (602) 506-3301 Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General - Maricopa County )

Yes, they are all available via the CivicAlerts page . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General - Maricopa County )

Yes, they are all available via the CivicAlerts page . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - General (Español) - Maricopa County )

It depends on the type of permit and the complexity of the review. For Floodplain Use permits, please review the Permitting Fee Schedule for specific costs. For Right-of-Way Use Permits see the Permit Use and Fees. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

Floodplain Use Permits in unincorporated Maricopa County must be paid at the Maricopa County Planning and Development Department while the Community Floodplain Use Permits for the jurisdictions that the District performs floodplain management for can be paid at the District or by phone by calling 602-506-1501. For Right-of-Way Use Permits, fees can be paid on-line as part of the on-line permitting process.  For more information visit the Right-of-Way Use Permit web page . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

The District has authority to enforce the Floodplain Regulations for Maricopa County on all Special Flood Hazard Areas within the boundaries of Maricopa County in order to protect other residents and to minimize damage and losses due to flooding. When development is proposed within these areas, it is the intent of the District to take reasonable action and enforce regulations on those that choose to build in Special Flood Hazard Areas in order to minimize the consequence of flooding and to prevent unwise development. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

If your neighbor has obtained an approved Floodplain Use Permit and/or Building Permit, it should minimize adverse impacts downstream. If the development or changes are not permitted, you can report them to the Maricopa County Planning and Development Department Code Enforcement Division. If you suspect the development is within a delineated floodplain within Maricopa County you can contact the District to open an investigation, 602-506-2419. All other potential floodplain violations, not within unincorporated Maricopa County, will be directed to the applicable jurisdiction. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

No. District channels are for carrying storm water only. Pool water has contaminants that can hurt the environment, and so is not allowed in District channels. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

No. Many of the District’s properties serve as replacement habitat and/or are environmentally sensitive areas. This fact along with the existing air quality standards within Maricopa County makes it prohibitive to allow off-road vehicle use on District property. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

Learn more about each permit type by browsing the Permits area . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits - Maricopa County )

The District has authority to enforce the Floodplain Regulations for Maricopa County on all Special Flood Hazard Areas within the boundaries of Maricopa County in order to protect other residents and to minimize damage and losses due to flooding. When development is proposed within these areas, it is the intent of the District to take reasonable action and enforce regulations on those that choose to build in Special Flood Hazard Areas in order to minimize the consequence of flooding and to prevent unwise development. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits (Español) - Maricopa County )

If your neighbor has obtained an approved Floodplain Use Permit and/or Building Permit, it should minimize adverse impacts downstream. If the development or changes are not permitted, you can report them to the Maricopa County Planning and Development Department Code Enforcement Division. If you suspect the development is within a delineated floodplain within Maricopa County you can contact the District to open an investigation, 602-506-2419. All other potential floodplain violations, not within unincorporated Maricopa County, will be directed to the applicable jurisdiction. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits (Español) - Maricopa County )

No. District channels are for carrying storm water only. Pool water has contaminants that can hurt the environment, and so is not allowed in District channels. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits (Español) - Maricopa County )

No. Many of the District’s properties serve as replacement habitat and/or are environmentally sensitive areas. This fact along with the existing air quality standards within Maricopa County makes it prohibitive to allow off-road vehicle use on District property. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits (Español) - Maricopa County )

Learn more about each permit type by browsing the Permits area . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Permits (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please contact the District's Contracts Supervisor, 602-506-4433, for questions or more information on procurement procedures, projects or registration. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

Please contact 602-506-2203 to receive specific information about District projects that have been surveyed. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

Flood control projects are typically initiated by the local jurisdiction where the project would be located. Working with the Flood Control District, the local jurisdiction submits the proposed project to the District "Prioritization Process" for consideration. The project may then at some point in the future move forward as a funded project. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

The Projects and Structures page on the website has the latest status of ongoing projects. If you need additional information, please call 602-506-4878. Find the latest status of ongoing projects on our Projects and Structures page. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

Priorities are set based on level of flood hazard, historic flooding, municipal partnership requests, development potential and funding availability. The goal is to plan and help build flood control projects that reduce flooding hazards, while balancing schedule, cost and social and environmental considerations. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

Project information can be found via the Projects and Structures map or listing , as well as in the Flood Hazard Identification Study map viewer . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies - Maricopa County )

Please contact the District's Contracts Supervisor, 602-506-4433, for questions or more information on procurement procedures, projects or registration. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please contact 602-506-5460 to receive specific information about District projects that have been surveyed. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

Flood control projects are typically initiated by the local jurisdiction where the project would be located. Working with the Flood Control District, the local jurisdiction submits the proposed project to the District "Prioritization Process" for consideration. The project may then at some point in the future move forward as a funded project. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

The Projects and Structures page on the website has the latest status of ongoing projects. If you need additional information, please call 602-506-4771. Find the latest status of ongoing projects on our Projects and Structures page. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

Priorities are set based on level of flood hazard, historic flooding, municipal partnership requests, development potential and funding availability. The goal is to plan and help build flood control projects that reduce flooding hazards, while balancing schedule, cost and social and environmental considerations. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

Project information can be found via the Projects and Structures map or listing , as well as in the Flood Hazard Identification Study map viewer . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Projects & Studies (Español) - Maricopa County )

It depends. Typically your local jurisdiction or home owners association (HOA) has maintenance responsibilities for drainage in your neighborhood therefore you should contact them first. If the District is responsible for the maintenance, please contact us, 602-506-1501, and ask to speak with the Operations and Maintenance Division. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

District properties are inspected routinely throughout the year by our Operations and Maintenance Division. Maintenance, such as vegetation removal, is performed annually or as necessary. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

Some easements can be verified by contacting the Property Engineering Branch, 602-506-0388. Some of the older easements across District property were not originally tracked so it may require getting a Title Report to verify easement grants across District property. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

Please contact the Property Management Branch, 602-506-4747. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

It depends. Please complete a one-time event permit via the District's Right of Way Use Permit process. Each request will be reviewed on an individual basis to determine if a permit will be authorized. If you need additional assistance, please contact our Right of Way Permits Branch, 602-506-0117. Learn more on our Right-of-Way Use Permit page. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

Please contact 602-506-1501 and request to speak with our Operations and Maintenance Division or submit an Inquiry Request which will be forwarded to our Operations and Maintenance Division. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance - Maricopa County )

It depends. Typically your local jurisdiction or home owners association (HOA) has maintenance responsibilities for drainage in your neighborhood therefore you should contact them first. If the District is responsible for the maintenance, please contact us, 602-506-1501, and ask to speak with the Operations and Maintenance Division. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

District properties are inspected routinely throughout the year by our Operations and Maintenance Division. Maintenance, such as vegetation removal, is performed annually or as necessary. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

The Flood Control District's website shows projects and associated land rights for those projects. If you have a very specific question as to boundary lines or ownership rights, you should contact the Real Estate Division's Property Engineering Branch. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

Some easements can be verified by contacting the Property Engineering Branch, 602-506-0388. Some of the older easements across District property were not originally tracked so it may require getting a Title Report to verify easement grants across District property. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please contact the Property Management Branch, 602-506-4747. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

It depends. Please complete a one-time event permit via the District's Right of Way Use Permit process. Each request will be reviewed on an individual basis to determine if a permit will be authorized. If you need additional assistance, please contact our Right of Way Permits Branch, 602-506-0117. Learn more on our Right-of-Way Use Permit page. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

Please contact 602-506-1501 and request to speak with our Operations and Maintenance Division or submit an Inquiry Request which will be forwarded to our Operations and Maintenance Division. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Property & Maintenance (Español) - Maricopa County )

An ALERT Station is the physical structure, either a standpipe or small building, which houses ALERT sensors, such as a rain gauge, water-level gauge, weather sensors or a combination of all of these. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

Yes. Historical weather data, including rainfall and stream-flow information, which does not appear on this site can be provided directly by the District for a nominal fee to cover the cost of compilation and reproduction. Please call 602-506-8701 for more information. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

Our rain gauges actually read in millimeters. One millimeter is equal to 0.03937 inches, which rounds up to 0.04 inches. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

The density of rain gauges and the placement of individual gauges are based on a variety of factors, including: - District Projects in the Area - Environmental Restraints - Flood Hazard Potential - The Location of Channels - Permitting Requirements - The Proximity of Existing Gauges - Watershed Boundaries Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

Average Wind Speed sensors do not transmit the instantaneous wind velocity but rather an average wind speed over a time period. They will show a value of "0" or "Down" when there is little or no wind for a 6-hour period. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

The water-year is used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other federal agencies to define a period of data collection. It runs from October 1st through September 30th. For example, water-year 2006 began on October 1, 2005 and ended on September 30, 2006. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather - Maricopa County )

An ALERT Station is the physical structure, either a standpipe or small building, which houses ALERT sensors, such as a rain gauge, water-level gauge, weather sensors or a combination of all of these. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

Yes. Historical weather data, including rainfall and stream-flow information, which does not appear on this site can be provided directly by the District for a nominal fee to cover the cost of compilation and reproduction. Please call 602-506-8701 for more information. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

Our rain gauges actually read in millimeters. One millimeter is equal to 0.03937 inches, which rounds up to 0.04 inches. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

The density of rain gauges and the placement of individual gauges are based on a variety of factors, including: - District Projects in the Area - Environmental Restraints - Flood Hazard Potential - The Location of Channels - Permitting Requirements - The Proximity of Existing Gauges - Watershed Boundaries Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

Average Wind Speed sensors do not transmit the instantaneous wind velocity but rather an average wind speed over a time period. They will show a value of "0" or "Down" when there is little or no wind for a 6-hour period. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

The water-year is used by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other federal agencies to define a period of data collection. It runs from October 1st through September 30th. For example, water-year 2006 began on October 1, 2005 and ended on September 30, 2006. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Rainfall & Weather (Español) - Maricopa County )

Rainfall and weather information can be found on our Rainfall and Weather page. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Storm Assistance - Maricopa County )

If you are experiencing an emergency, please call 911 for police, fire, and paramedics. All residents are encouraged to share flooding photos on a site that was created to enable residents to view and share pictures and videos of current and past flooding incidents, visit the Report a Flood website. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Storm Assistance - Maricopa County )

Call your local Fire Department to see if they have sandbags and sand. Availability may depend on the event. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Storm Assistance - Maricopa County )

Please reach out to non-emergency contacts from our Customer Assistance Storm Team (PDF) . Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Storm Assistance - Maricopa County )

Call your local Fire Department to see if they have sandbags and sand. Availability may depend on the event. Return to Flood Control District ( Flood Control - Storm Assistance (Español) - Maricopa County )

There are many options for the flu vaccine this year. Below is an overview of each option; click the link to learn more about each one.  If you have questions about any of these options, please talk with a doctor about what is right for you or your child. Standard dose flu shots : These injections are given into the muscle.  They are usually given with a needle.  Two versions (Afluria and Afluria Quadrivalent) can be given to some people (those aged 18 through 64 years) with a jet injector. High-dose shots :  These are approved for people aged 65 and older. Fluzone High-Dose is three-component (trivalent) inactivated flu vaccine, manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc. Who can get it:   Fluzone High-Dose is licensed specifically for people 65 years and older.  Why it's high-dose: Fluzone High-Dose contains four times the antigen (the part of the vaccine that helps your body build up protection against flu viruses) of standard-dose inactivated influenza vaccines. The higher dose of antigen in the vaccine is intended to give older people a better immune response, and therefore, better protection against flu. Shots made with adjuvant : These are for people aged 65 and older. An adjuvant is an ingredient added to a vaccine that helps create a stronger immune response to vaccination.  How it's made:  It is manufactured using an egg-based process (like most flu vaccines), and it is formulated with the adjuvant MF59.  What makes it different:  FLUAD is a standard-dose, three-component (trivalent) inactivated flu vaccine, manufactured by Seqirus that contains an adjuvant.  Who can get it:  FLUAD is designed specifically for people 65 years and older. Shots made with virus grown in cell culture: A cell-based flu vaccine was developed as an alternative to the egg-based manufacturing process.  What makes it different:  Cell culture technology is potentially more flexible than the traditional technology, which relies upon adequate supply of eggs. In addition, the cell-based flu vaccine has the potential to offer better protection than traditional, egg-based flu vaccines as a result of being more similar to flu viruses in circulation.. Shots made using a vaccine production technology : This type is also called a recombinant vaccine.  What makes it different: It does not require the use of flu virus and does not use chicken eggs in the production process.  Who can get it: Currently, recombinant flu vaccine is the only egg-free vaccine on the U.S. market. Flublok Quadrivalent is approved for use in people 18 years and older. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) : This is commonly called the nasal spray vaccine.  Who can get it: The nasal spray is approved for use in non-pregnant individuals, 2 years through 49 years of age.  Who cannot get it: People with some medical conditions should not receive the nasal spray flu vaccine. Does Fluzone High-Dose offer better protection than the adjuvanted flu vaccine? To date, there have been no randomized studies comparing Fluzone High-Dose with FLUAD (the adjuvanted influenza vaccine). ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

While seasonal influenza (flu) viruses are detected year-round in the United States, flu is most common during the fall and winter . The exact timing and duration of flu seasons can vary, but influenza activity often begins to increase in October. Most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, although activity can last as late as May. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

No. The flu shot is made from an  inactivated influenza virus and cannot give you the flu .  "But my mom got sick..." Some people experience body aches and fatigue for a short time after getting the flu shot, which is the body’s immune system responding to the vaccine .   It is also possible that you may be exposed to a flu virus shortly before getting vaccinated or during the 2 weeks it takes the body to develop an immune response after getting vaccinated. This exposure may result in you becoming ill with flu before the vaccine begins to protect you. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

Unfortunately, we won’t know whether the flu vaccine is a good match to circulating flu viruses until well into the flu season. It’s not possible to predict with certainty if a flu vaccine will be a good match for circulating flu viruses.  A flu vaccine is made to protect against the flu viruses that research and surveillance indicate will likely be most common during the season. However, experts must pick which flu viruses to include in a flu vaccine many months in advance in order for flu vaccines to be produced and delivered on time .  CDC works to characterize about 2000 circulating flu viruses every year to compare them to the virus strains in the vaccine.  This helps them understand the flu vaccine’s ability to produce an immune response in people. It also helps them decide what strains to include in the next season’s flu vaccine. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

The number of pediatric deaths from influenza is required to be reported to public health in Arizona by state statute.  Because there is no requirement to report influenza-related deaths in adults, we monitor adult deaths due to influenza and/or pneumonia as a substitute.   People who die from influenza typically do not die from influenza itself. They usually die from the bacterial pneumonia that can occur as a complication to influenza. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

Influenza viruses are constantly changing. They can change in two different ways:  "Antigenic Drift" One way they change is called “antigenic drift.” These are small changes in the genes of influenza viruses that happen continually over time as the virus replicates. But these small genetic changes can accumulate over time and result in viruses that are look different to the body’s immune system. When this happens, the body’s immune system may not recognize those viruses. That is why the flu vaccine composition must be reviewed each year and updated as needed to keep up with changing viruses. "Antigenic Shift" The other type of change is called “antigenic shift.” Antigenic shift is an abrupt, major change in the influenza A viruses, resulting in a completely different virus that infects humans. Such a shift occurred in the spring of 2009, when an H1N1 virus with a new combination of genes emerged to infect people and quickly spread, causing a pandemic. When shift happens, most people have little or no protection against the new virus. While influenza viruses are changing by antigenic drift all the time, antigenic shift happens only occasionally. Type A viruses undergo both kinds of changes; influenza type B viruses change only by the more gradual process of antigenic drift. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

You should get a flu vaccine before flu begins spreading in your community. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body. CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October.   Children who need two doses of vaccine to be protected should start the vaccination process sooner, because the two doses must be given at least four weeks apart.          Does my child need two doses? ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

No. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against influenza virus infection. That’s why it’s better to get vaccinated by the end of October, before the flu season really gets under way. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

Flu vaccine protection lasts about one year. Other than children who are getting the flu vaccine for the first time, people only need one dose of flu vaccine each season.   ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

Some people who get vaccinated may still get sick. However, flu vaccination has been shown to reduce severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick .  The vaccine has also been shown to reduce deaths, intensive care unit admissions, and length of hospitalization  among hospitalized flu patients.  A 2017 study was the first of its kind to show that flu vaccination can significantly reduce a child’s risk of dying from influenza . ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

A flu vaccine is needed every season for two reasons:  The body’s immune response from vaccination declines over time, so an annual vaccine is needed for optimal protection.  Flu viruses are constantly changing, the formulation of the flu vaccine is reviewed each year and updated as needed to keep up with changing flu viruses.  For the best protection, everyone 6 months and older should get vaccinated annually. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

To find a flu vaccine for you or your child, please visit the flu page and use the Flu Vaccine Finder widget that has options for free flu shots for children and other flu shot options for adults. ( Flu FAQ - Maricopa County )

HIV is the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. It is a virus that can cause AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). A member of a group of viruses called retroviruses, HIV infects human cells and uses the energy and nutrients provided by those cells to grow and reproduce. HIV lives in the blood, semen, vaginal secretions and breast milk or any bodily fluid that contains blood cells. HIV typically targets the T cells of the immune system. However, it can also attack cells of the brain, nervous system, digestive system, lymphatic system, and other parts of the body. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

HIV can be transmitted when an HIV infected person has any type of sexual intercourse with another person. This includes vaginal or anal intercourse, and oral sex on a man or woman without a condom or other barrier. Intercourse while a woman is having her period, or during outbreaks of genital sores or lesions (caused by herpes and other sexually transmitted diseases) can increase the risk of HIV transmission. Transmission can also occur from sharing needles (tattoo and IV drug use), accidental needle sticks, infected blood products prior to 1985, pregnancy, childbirth or breastfeeding, and transplanted organs from donors. Routine screening of organs and blood products began in 1985. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

The only way to ensure that you are 100% safe from HIV transmission is to abstain from sex. Outside of abstaining from sex, you can decrease your risk for HIV transmission by using a new condom each time you have sexual intercourse, to include oral sex. For oral sex on a woman, the use of a dental dam is recommended in order to decrease the risk of HIV transmission. There is more than one type of barrier available for oral, anal and vaginal sex, the first being the male condom . The male condom should be used according to the manufacturer's instructions with a water-based lubricant for anal and vaginal sex. Also available are flavored male condoms that can effectively be used for oral sex on a male. These are not recommended for vaginal penetration, as they can cause yeast infections given that they are often coated in sugar. The second most common type of protection is the female condom . This should also be used according to the manufacturer's instructions with lubricant for vaginal sex. A couple should not use a male condom and a female condom at the same time as this will cause one or both of them to rip or tear. Lastly, dental dams are recommended for oral sex on a woman and also come in assorted flavors. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

You are at risk for HIV if you have unprotected vaginal, anal or oral intercourse or share needles with a partner who is positive for HIV. You cannot tell whether a person is positive for HIV by looking at them. The only way to know for sure that you are not positive for HIV is to get tested at your doctor's office, local health department, or other HIV testing facility. According to the CDC, certain populations are at an increasingly greater risk for HIV transmission: African Americans Hispanic Americans IV Drug Users Men Who Have Sex With Men Teens Women Testing CDC now recommends that everybody should be tested at least once per year. CDC also recommends that those people who are at high-risk of becoming infected with HIV should test more frequently. You can talk with your doctor or an HIV counselor about how frequently you should be tested for HIV. Risk Factors You might be at higher risk for getting HIV if: You are having unprotected sex with a partner of unknown HIV status You or your partner has had more than one partner in the last 12 months You are a man who has sex with men Your partner is HIV positive You share needles during IV drug use You share needles or ink during tattooing You are a healthcare worker who works with blood or blood products You exchange sex for drugs or money You had a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1985 Your partner has participated in any of the above behaviors ( HIV - Maricopa County )

The HIV-antibody test is the only way to tell if you are infected. You cannot tell by looking at someone if he or she carries HIV. Someone can look and feel perfectly healthy and still be infected. In fact, an estimated one out of every five people who are HIV positive do not know it. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

HIV tests look for your body’s response to an HIV infection (called ‘antibodies’). Each persons’ body is different and some people may develop a response to an infection faster than others. While most people develop an antibody response to HIV within the first 3-6 weeks after being infected, some people may take as long as 3 months or longer. To find out when you should be tested, discuss it with an HIV counselor at the HIV test site or with your personal physician. During the time between exposure and the test, it is important to avoid any behavior that might result in exposure to blood, semen, or vaginal secretions. If your exposure happened in the last 3 days (72 hours) please contact your doctor immediately or go to your nearest urgent care center for evaluation. You may be eligible for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis, medication that can prevention an HIV infection from happening in your body. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

Having HIV does not necessarily mean you are going to get sick or die soon. HIV works slowly in the body. Most people with HIV infection are healthy and fairly free from symptoms for many years. If you test positive for HIV, immediate medical treatment and a healthy lifestyle can help you stay well. There are now many drugs that treat HIV infection and AIDS-related illnesses. Prompt medical care may help delay the onset of AIDS and prevent some life-threatening conditions. If you receive a rapid HIV test (OraQuick, UniGold or ClearView), your blood will be drawn using venipuncture and sent to a lab for a confirmatory test. It usually takes two weeks to receive the results for the confirmatory test. While you are waiting for the results from the confirmatory test, you will meet with staff members from our Partner Services Program who will begin to assist you with connecting you with services, notifying your partners, , helping your partners gain early access to individualized counseling, HIV testing, medical evaluation, treatment, and other prevention services. This also provides clients and their partners who test positive a chance to talk with other people about HIV, learn more about this chronic illness, and develop a plan to address his or her feelings, find out about local resources, and learn that people living with HIV are not alone. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

If your test is negative, you were either not infected with HIV, or you have been infected with HIV, but your body has not yet produced enough HIV Antibodies for the test to detect them in your blood. If you had an unprotected sexual encounter or shared needles with anybody within the three months prior to your test, you can talk to your doctor or HIV Counselor about when you should be re-tested. During the time you are waiting to be retested, it is recommended that you abstain from sex or use a new barrier/condom with each sexual act during this time. It is also recommended that you refrain from sharing needles during drug use. If your last unprotected sexual encounter or needle-sharing encounter was more than three months before your test and your test is negative, you now have the ability to remain negative by obtaining education on how to participate in safer sex practices. Visit the CDC to learn about safer sex practices . ( HIV - Maricopa County )

No. Your HIV test result reveals only your current HIV status. Your negative test result does not tell you whether your partner has HIV. The only way to know your partner’s HIV status is for that person to get tested and share their results with you. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

If you feel that you might have been exposed to HIV within the last 72 hours, you might be able to take medication to prevent becoming HIV+. Medication can only be prescribed by a doctor so if you cannot get to your doctor immediately, please go to your nearest Urgent Care center. Not everybody will need medication, your doctor will talk with you about your exposure and decide if medication is necessary. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

You and your partner have several options when it comes to disclosing HIV status with each other. You can share a copy of your tests result with your partner if you choose. You will need to bring a photo ID with you at the time of your test so that you can get your results in writing. You may also choose to bring your partner with you for a joint counseling session with one of our HIV counselors after your testing session is over and you receive your results. Your counselor is not allowed to disclose your results to your partner but is available to answer questions you or your partner might have. If your partner chooses to get tested also, he or she may do so in a separate private session. We will never test two people together nor will we test somebody with a friend or family in the room. This is so that you have complete privacy and confidentiality. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

This website does not provide legal advice therefore this question is best answered by an attorney who is licensed to practice in Arizona. If you do not have an attorney, you can contact the Maricopa County Bar Lawyer Referral Service at 602-257-4434 for a free 30-minute telephone consultation. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

No. Although HIV+ individuals are reported to the local and State Health Department for public health purposes, all information is kept in the strictest confidentiality and will not be released to anybody without the express written consent of the HIV+ person. The only way to know your partner’s status is to ask them. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

The Maricopa County Department of Public Health may be trying to contact you for any number of reasons. The bottom line is that, if they are trying to reach you, please speak to them. Public Health is tasked with protecting the health of the public by identifying and treating people who have an infectious disease, by notifying and testing people who have been exposed to an infectious disease and by preventing infectious diseases in the environment. Public Health investigates 87 different infectious diseases. We also provide WIC services, routine childhood and adult immunizations, food inspections, food handlers cards, mosquito fogging and many, many other services. No matter what your situation is, Public Health is here to help. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

Absolutely! The Ryan White Program is a federally funded insurance program specifically for HIV+ people who do not have any other source of income. Ryan White covers everything from medical care and medication to transportation and case management services. If you are currently un-insured and are HIV+ you can contact our office at 602-506-2934 for assistance. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

You are not legally required to disclose your HIV status however your partners are at risk and should be tested. Public Health offers the opportunity to notify your partners for you without giving up your information. That’s the best part, your status remains confidential and your partners can get tested. Just call us at 602-506-2934, tell us about your partner and we’ll do the rest. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

Because HIV mutates so quickly, each person’s HIV infection is unique to them, especially if one or both of you are taking medication. The strain of HIV in your body is under control by the medication you’re taking. If you also get your partner’s HIV strain, you get what’s called a “super-infection”; you now have two different strains of HIV in your body: one strain that your medication can control and one that your medication cannot control. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

Most people who have HIV look and feel perfectly healthy and don’t show symptoms for many years. A healthy lifestyle, good medical care and adherence to medication are all factors that allow people with HIV to live long, healthy and productive lives. In fact, one in five people with HIV don’t even know they have it. Most people who get HIV get it from somebody that looks healthy. The only way to know a person’s HIV status is to ask them. The best way to protect yourself from getting HIV is to use condoms with each and every partner. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

It’s never a good idea to wait until you feel sick before seeing a doctor. The sooner you see a doctor who specializes in HIV care, the better off you are. You and your doctor will be able to work together to keep your HIV infection under control and keep your body healthy for a long time. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

Everybody should get tested at least once a year regardless of whether or not they think they are at risk. Many people with HIV don’t know that they have it because they don’t think they need to be tested. Your doctor can test you at your next visit or you can get tested at any of the local HIV service agencies in town including your local health department. The only way to know your HIV status is to get tested. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

The CDC recommends that everybody get tested at least once a year for HIV. Most insurance programs cover HIV testing as part of your routine medical exam with your doctor. Even though your insurance company will know you got tested, they will not get the results of your test. However, if you choose not to get tested by your doctor, you can get tested by an HIV service organization that will not bill your insurance. If your test result is positive and you are worried about losing your insurance coverage our Partner Services staff will discuss your options. ( HIV - Maricopa County )

CCRA applications are only accepted from tenants/renters, and not from landlords. Please direct your tenant/renter to visit the County CCRA website for information on how to apply at https://www.maricopa.gov/5691/Emergency-Rental-Assistance . ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

A Landlord can either provide a W9 to the renter applicant or register as a County vendor at: a Maricopa County Vendor at: https://azdom-vss-ext.hostams.com/PRDVSS2X1/Advantage4 . W9s and/or registration as a County vendor is required for a CCRA payment to be made to a Landlord. Maricopa County is issuing a payment (income) to a landlord, which according to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires the County to provide the Landlord with a 1099 Form. The W9 and/or registration as a County vendor provides the detailed information (including Social Security Number and/or Employer Identification Number) to ensure the landlord is a valid entity and allows checks to be issued to the Landlord. The Landlord Verification Form is required as it validates from the landlord which months’ rent are owed and/or due from the tenant as well as provides the Landlord’s contact information and payment address. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

If you have already completed a Landlord Verification Form for a tenant once before, and they are requesting you to do it again this is due to them requesting an additional assistance payment. The Landlord Verification Form is required to verify which months’ rent is owed and/or due. However, the W9 and/or vendor registration is not required again as you have already received payment from Maricopa County, and as such are a registered vendor. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

The Landlord Verification Form must still be completed for each individual tenant requesting CCRA. This form verifies which months’ rent is owed and/or due. If the tenant is approved for CCRA, vendor registration will be verified during the payment process. If it is determined that a Landlord is not registered as a vendor, then the application will be returned to the tenant’s case worker and tenant and/or case worker will notify you that a W9 form or registration as a County vendor is required ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

  Due to the large volume of CCRA payments, we are unable to provide additional information regarding specific tenants or CCRA payment amounts. Please request CCRA status from your tenant directly. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

Upon tenant final CCRA approval from Maricopa County, a Landlord can expect a payment within 10 days. If an email is provided on the Landlord Verification Form, the Landlord will receive an email upon check issuance. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

Due to the large volume of CCRA payments, we are unable to provide additional information regarding specific tenants or CCRA payment amounts. If you have received a check issuance notification, the check will be mailed to the remittance address you listed on the Landlord Verification Form, and can be expected to be received based on typical United States Postal Service processing timeframes. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

A Landlord who wants to receive payments via EFT must register themselves as a Maricopa County Vendor at: https://azdom-vss-ext.hostams.com/PRDVSS2X1/Advantage4 . During this registration, bank information will need to be provided. After registration is complete, a $0.00 prenote test will be sent to your bank. This prenote begins the “test cycle” to ensure that the information provided was accurately entered in the financial system. It takes approximately 9 days to complete this test cycle (the account will be on “hold payment” status during the prenote test). If there are no problems with the test cycle, EFT payments will begin thereafter. ( HSD - CCRA Responses to Landlords - Maricopa County )

Absolutely! All Head Start classrooms have an open door policy that encourages you to visit your child any time you can without an advance phone call or invitation. If you have a half-hour or a whole day you come in and visit. Your child will feel so important and know that their school is important to you as well. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Head Start encourages parent involvement. Research has proven that the more active parents are in their children’s education, the more successful children are in school. Furthermore, the more involved the parent is with the program, the more significant their Head Start experience is for them. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Parents may bring younger siblings to participate in the class when they volunteer in the classroom or field trips. The younger siblings: - Must be listed on the visitors log. - Must be current on their immunizations. - Must be able to follow classroom rules. - Must be watched and supervised by the parent at all times. - Must follow Head Start policies. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Ten percent of enrollment is offered to children with disabilities. We work with the local School System, mental health specialist and other resources to make sure the children get the services they need. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

No, Head Start does not require children to be potty trained for enrollment. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Classroom schedules limit outdoor time between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. due to the extreme sun damaging rays. Shade and water will be available for all children on the playground at all times. A sun safety checklist for clothing, hats, sunglasses, sunscreen and more detailed information is available for parents upon request. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

There are several ways to submit an application for your child to enroll in Head Start. You may come to our main office to complete an application: 2150 S Country Club Drive Mesa AZ, 85210 Or you may call our office at 480-464-9669 to request an appointment and we will arrange to meet you at a time that is best for you. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

We believe that all children are entitled to respect and dignity. Preschool age children are beginning to learn about their emotions and the need to take responsibility for their actions. Through the use of problem solving, positive behavior support techniques, and individualization of expectations, all children can be successful in the classroom. The Mental Health Specialist provides regular visits to each classroom to consult with parents, consult with staff, and to provide observations and suggestions as needed to assist staff in promoting positive behavior outcomes for all children. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

We have 3 teaching staff in each classroom: two teachers and a teacher’s aide. Each classroom has staff members who are CPR, First Aid certified. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

For Head Start, your child must be between 3 and 4 years of age. Not older than 5 years old by August 31, 2012. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

A part of our Home Based program includes two monthly center based socialization days. These days provide a chance for parents to come together for training/education and for children to play and explore with other children. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

If you have a child who you have legal custody or guardianship of that child may be eligible to attend Head Start. If you have a foster child in your home they are automatically qualified and may attend Head Start. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

If your child is not selected at the beginning of the year, this does not mean they will not be selected for that school year. We select children all year long up until the last 60 days of the school year. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Power of Attorney document with the seal, adoption papers, custody or relevant documents stating that the child is temporarily in your care. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Our staff will be able to assist you or a member of your family with accessing any community services you may need, such as assistance with housing, food, clothing, counseling, or health care assistance. Please do not hesitate to ask for assistance. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Children ages three to four years old whose family income is at or below the Poverty Guidelines published by the federal government, are eligible for Head Start. Children ages Zero to 36 months whose family income is at or below the Poverty Guidelines published by the federal government, are eligible for Early Head Start. Pregnant Women may also be eligible for Early Head Start and Home Base. Eligibility for Head Start/Early Head Start includes: - Families whose income is at or below these guidelines - Families providing child’s proof of birth such (Birth Certificate, Passport, Live Birth Certificate (EHS), CPS paperwork) - Families providing Proof of Address of residency in East Maricopa County. - Families providing Child’s Immunization Record (recommended) Automatically eligible in HS/EHS includes: - Families who are receiving public assistance (TANF, SSI) - Families who do not have a fixed, regular or adequate nighttime residence, or families who share housing due to loss of housing due to economic hardship (Homeless) - Children in foster care, regardless of family income (Foster children, usually zero income, we do not count family income) ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Head Start students are learning pre-reading skills daily. Some children may be reading at the end of the year and some may not. It is not developmentally appropriate to expect a three-year-old to know how to read. Head Start emphasizes the importance of literacy experiences through-out the whole school year. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

If you have already completed and submitted an application there is a process called Application Eligibility Review which determines if your family meets the Federal Income Guidelines and eligibility and age criteria for the program and you will be wait-listed for selection. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Once the packet is completed, you will be contacted by your child's teacher. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

An FSS will contact you to complete the enrollment packet for your child. Part of the enrollment packet will require getting a current physical, dental and immunization record for your child. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

The Head Start nutritionist will work with you to develop a Special Meal Request. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Medication can be administered in the classroom when the medication schedule indicates a dose during class time and when it has been prescribed by a medical provider. The medication must be brought to school in the original labeled prescription container. A Medication Consent form and the medication log must be completed by the parent or guardian, as well as two Instructional Staff who have been trained by the parent on how to administer the medication. Children requiring medication for more than 30 days will require an Individual Health Plan (IHP) coordinated with the Health Coordinator. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Children are eligible to participate in Head Start if they are from low-income families or if their families are eligible for public assistance. The Head Start Act establishes income eligibility for participation in Head Start programs based on the poverty guidelines updated annually in the Federal Register by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

EHS classrooms have a single session which goes from 7:30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. class. These sessions are held Monday-Friday. For Home Base Program a teacher meets with you at your house or at the location you prefer for 1.5 hours per week and socializations twice at month per 3.5 hours at a classroom or designed location. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Most of our classrooms have two sessions from which you can choose; am class which goes from 8-11:30 a.m., or the p.m. class which goes from 12:30-4 p.m. Both of these sessions are held Monday-Thursday. We do have a few classrooms that are single session and go from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. For Home Base Program a teacher meets with you at your house or at the location you prefer for 1.5 hours per week and Socializations twice at month per 3.5 hrs at a classroom or designed location. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Income requirements are set by the federal government and are changed each year. The best way to see if your family qualifies is to submit an application or call 480-464-9669 and speak to a Family Support Specialist. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Home visits are scheduled weekly for 1 1/2 hours. Part of the time focuses on parent child interactions and stages of your child’s development. The home base teacher works in partnership with the family to ensure you have what you need to move forward and be successful. This could include assisting with home safety checks, providing information on topics such as breast feeding, income or housing issues, education, and more. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

The home visitor assists a mother in understanding the different stages of development as well as prenatal care. In addition, Head Start also has a strong focus on health, safety and nutrition for the entire family. The home visitor will work with the family to ensure they have all the resources they need. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

If a child has not been picked up after fifteen minutes of the end of class, the parent or one of the emergency contacts will be notified to pick up the child. A child left longer than one hour will be considered "abandoned" and Child Protective Services (CPS) may be notified (as appropriate, considering what is known about the family circumstances). Continuous late pick-ups may cause a child to be dropped from the program. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

When registering your child for Head Start you signed a "permission to treat" form that will allow us to take your child for emergency treatment if it becomes necessary. Minor injuries will be dealt with in class and you will receive an accident report from your child's teacher. In any situation involving a major injury you will be notified immediately and it will be covered by Insurance. This is an example of why your child's emergency information sheet needs to be correct and up to date at all times. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

If your child becomes ill at school we will contact you through the numbers you provided on your child's emergency sheet. If you are not available we will continue to call the other contact numbers you have provided until we find someone who can pick your child up from class. Please be sure to provide adequate emergency contact information to your child's teacher, this is crucial. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

At Head Start we encourage "no-thank-you bites" of foods that are new to the children; we do not force children to eat. Accommodations will be met to service the needs of children with special dietary needs or allergies. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Occasional potty accidents are developmentally appropriate for young children. The Head Start teaching staff will assist your child in getting cleaned up and changed. A change of clothing must be on-hand in the classroom for your child in case of spills or potty accidents. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Children who come from families with slightly higher income may be able to participate in Head Start when space is available. Please visit us and we can discuss this with you. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Families who may not meet income guidelines can call their local school district or we will provide you with resources to locate a preschool close to your residence. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

- Family: The term “family” means all persons living the same household who are either: a) Supported by the income of the parent(s) or guardian(s) of the child enrolling in a Head Start program and b) Related to the parent(s) or guardian(s) by blood, marriage, or adoption - Household: A household consists of all the persons who occupy a housing unit (house or apartment), whether they are related to each other or not. If a family and an unrelated individual, or two unrelated individuals, are living in the same housing unit, they would constitute two family units. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Income means gross cash income and include earned income, military income (including pay and allowances), veteran’s benefits, Social Security benefits, unemployment compensation, child support and public assistance benefits. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

The program provides services to low-income children zero-five years of age as described below: - Center-Based Program provides services in a classroom setting. - Home-Based Program meets in the family’s home once a week for 1 1/2 hours. Socialization for parent and child is held twice a month for 3 1/2 hours at a classroom or designated location. Head Start socializations are conducted on Fridays. Early Head Start socialization sessions are conducted on designated days (ask your Home Visitor for the day of your socialization). - Special Needs - Head Start enrolls children with disabilities and special health care needs in collaboration with school districts and other agencies. Ten percent of Head Start’s enrollment slots must be filled with children with a disability certified by the School District or the Arizona Early Intervention Program (AzEIP). All disabilities services are provided by the school districts or by AzEIP. Children may receive these services in the school district classroom, the Head Start classroom, or in the child’s home. - Bilingual Staff and volunteers offer guidance and support to children who do not speak English. - Screenings - Developmental, behavioral, vision and hearing screenings are completed on all children within the first 45 days of entering the program. Nutrition screenings are also completed. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Children have breakfast and lunch or lunch and a snack, which provides at least two-thirds of their daily nutritional needs. Meals are served family-style (children and adults sit at tables together) and are a special time for children and teachers. Children help with activities such as setting the table, passing food to others, and cleaning up. Children also have the opportunity to participate in monthly food experiences or activities. Young infants are fed on demand with the formula or breast milk prescribed by your physician. Provisions are made in our facilities for the storage of breast milk. Older infants and toddlers have breakfast, lunch, and a snack each day. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

No. Head Start provides all learning materials and supplies. Children are provided lunch and breakfast daily at no expense to the parent. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

You will receive a phone call explaining if your child is selected or will remain on our wait-list. The selection process starts in July and continues through the start of the school year in August. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

In Head Start we normally start in August and end in May. In Early Head start classes are normally year around starting in July and ending in June. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Assuring regular and complete health care for children is an important part of the Early Head Start/Head Start program. The health component of HS/EHS includes immunizations, physicals, dentals, hearing, vision, hemoglobin and blood lead screens. Head Start and Early Head Start want to ensure healthy development in all areas of your child’s growth. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

When you see your child "just" playing you may not realize that they are learning - they may not realize they are learning! When your child is playing with play dough they are strengthening their hand muscles which will later help them to write words. While your child is playing in the dramatic play area they are learning how to be social, share and relate to their peer through problem solving skills. When your child is playing in the block area they are using imagination in comparing, measuring, and building to represent things they have seen. These are math skills. Your child is learning through play. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Head Start is a family program that places high regard on health. Your child does not need a physical or dental to start in the classroom. It is a state licensing requirement that your child has annual physical and up to date shots. It is a Head Start requirement that your child visits the dentist. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Head Start teachers visit your home to encourage a relationship between school and families. Research has shown that a positive relationship between teacher and families fosters your child's learning experience. We will answer questions you may have, discuss your child's development, help you with needed resources and leave you with a home activity. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Transportation services are not provided to Head Start or Early Head Start classrooms. While the program does not provide any transportation services, we can assist you in riding the public bus system or help find another parent who might be able to assist you. If no transportation assistance is available, we can enroll you in the home-based program. The program can assist home-based families who need transportation assistance to the socialization site. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

No, your child will remain on the wait-list for the current program year until a vacancy occurs in that center. If you move within our Service area, you will need to contact the family support specialist for that area to transfer your child's application to another center without reapplying. ( Human Services - Education / Head Start - Maricopa County )

Yes. Studies show that kids' bodies - even infants - can handle many shots at once. Having several vaccines at once is safe, even for a newborn. Combination vaccines protect your child against more than one disease with a single shot. It's not your imagination; there are a greater number of shots now than even a few years ago. That's because as science advances, we are able to protect your child against more diseases than ever before. ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

Thanks to vaccines, most diseases prevented by vaccines are no longer common in this country. Even the few cases we have in the U.S. could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases if we stopped vaccinating. It's not uncommon to have measles outbreaks, whooping cough outbreaks, chickenpox outbreaks, and other diseases when vaccination rates drop. Kids that are not fully vaccinated can become seriously sick and spread it through a community. ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

No. Scientific studies and reviews have found no relationship between vaccines and autism. Groups of experts, including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine (IOM), also agree that vaccines are not responsible for the number of children now recognized to have autism. ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

Chickenpox can actually be a serious disease for kids if the blisters become infected. Before vaccine was available, about 50 kids died every year from chickenpox, and about 1 in 500 kids who got chickenpox were hospitalized. ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

Yes, usually. Talk with the doctor, but children can usually get vaccinated even if they have a mild illness like a cold, earache, mild fever or diarrhea. If the doctor says it is okay, your child can still get vaccinated. ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

For a complete list of vaccines and their thimerosal content level, you may visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Additionally, you may ask your health care provider or pharmacist for a copy of the vaccine package insert. It lists ingredients in the vaccine and discusses any known adverse reactions. U.S. Food and Drug Administration ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

Yes, usually if a child has received vaccines in Arizona, we can look your child up in the Arizona State Immunization Information System (ASIIS). For our clinic information, go to our Locations page. You also can check with the medical provider who your child received the vaccines from for a copy of the shot record. Locations Page ( Immunizations - Maricopa County )

La Clínica de ETS se encuentra en el Edificio de Salud Pública, en 1645 E. Roosevelt, Phoenix, AZ 85006. El edificio queda justo al oriente (este), de la calle 16 por la Roosevelt. Hay suficiente espacio para estacionarse en frente del edificio. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

La Clínica de ETS es ambulatoria, así que no hace falta sacar cita. Cuando consiga el número que le dará su recepcionista, le dirán más o menos cuándo le atenderán. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Sí. Toda la información sobre usted y su visita se mantendrá estrictamente confidencial. No se le enviará correspondencia ni se le harán llamadas telefónicas de la clínica sin su permiso. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Cuando llegue, la recepcionista a la entrada le preguntará el motivo de su visita. Según los servicios que usted busque, se le dará un boleto con un número y se le enviará al área de inscripción. Llamarán su número y concluirá su trámite de inscripción. Una vez termine de inscribirse, se le enviará al área de espera de la Clínica de ETS. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

El costo para examinarse y atenderse (si hiciera falta) será $20, los cuales se le pedirán cuando se inscriba. El costo auténtico de hacerse pruebas, examinarse y atenderse excede por mucho la tarifa de $20 que se pide. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Cuando se atienda en la clínica, los empleados le llamarán por el número de su boleto en vez de por su nombre. Esto protege su privacidad y confidencialidad. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

El sistema controla los números electrónicamente. Los números se llaman en orden según los servicios que solicite cada cual. Como proporcionamos tantos servicios distintos por todas las clínicas, a veces parece que los números se llaman sin seguir el orden. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Primero le atenderá un(a) asistente médico para sacarle una muestra de sangre. Después le atenderá un(a) proveedor (médico/a, enfermero/a práctico/a o asistente médico/a) que apuntará sus antecedentes sexuales, le explicará el procedimiento del examen, le practicará un examen de ETS a fondo (para las mujeres, se trata de un examen pélvico, no una prueba de Papanicolaou) y se le darán los medicamentos necesarios, al igual que se le programará cualquier cita de seguimiento. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Si se le diagnosticara una ETS, se le proporcionaría tratamiento. También pudieran referir a otro/a empleado/a para darle más asesoría, incluso para orientarle sobre cómo platicar con su(s) pareja(s) sexual(es) en cuanto a su exposición a una ETS y cómo prevenir nuevas infecciones. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

La mayoría de los pacientes terminan su trámite de registración en 15 minutos o menos. Cuando obtenga el número que le dé su recepcionista, se le indicará más o menos cuánto tardarán en atenderle en la clínica. Pudiera quedarse en la sala de espera de la clínica hasta que le llamen o pudiera salir una vez termine de inscribirse y regresar por lo menos 30 minutos antes de la hora que le indicó su recepcionista. Si regresara tarde y llegara después de la hora que le dijo su recepcionista, se le exigirá que saque un número nuevo y tal vez no puedan atenderle ese mismo día, según la cantidad de clientes que haya antes que usted. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Por lo común, la Clínica de ETS está lo más concurrida los lunes y viernes. Las horas más concurridas son entre las 11:30 AM y las 2:00 PM. Su recepcionista pudiera dejar de darles números a los pacientes, o cesar de dar números por una porción del día, si se alcanzara el volumen máximo de pacientes. Para aumentar su probabilidad de que le atiendan el mismo día, se le recomienda encarecidamente a que llegue temprano a la clínica. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Se ofrecen servicios de pruebas expresas (aceleradas) para todas las ETS excepto el herpes. Cuando se inscriba, llenará un breve cuestionario confidencial. Si no tiene síntomas y se determina que tiene menor riesgo de ETS o de infección con el VIH, se le ofrecerá la oportunidad de examinarse mediante una prueba expresa. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

La clínica de ETS le puede hacer pruebas para todas las infecciones de ETS, incluso gonorrea, clamidia, sífilis, herpes y VIH. La prueba de herpes no puede practicarse de manera expresa porque sólo se le efectúa a los pacientes que presenten síntomas, y exige que un proveedor medico le atienda primero. El herpes no se incluye entre las pruebas rutinarias de ETS. La prueba de VIH se ofrece en la Clínica de ETS únicamente en conjunto con las pruebas de ETS. La prueba de VIH no se ofrece en la Clínica de ETS aparte de las demás pruebas de ETS. Además, la prueba acelerada de VIH sólo se ofrece si los pacientes reúnen los requisitos de “alto riesgo”. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

La Clínica de ETS proporciona pruebas y tratamiento para infecciones de ETS. Si las pruebas o el examen revelaran otro problema médico, se le remitirá a su médico/a de cabecera. Si no tiene médico/a de cabecera, se le proporcionará una lista de clínicas y médicos en dónde podrá obtener más atenciones y tratamientos. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Una vez concluya su consulta, se le proporcionará un número telefónico a llamar para conseguir el resultado de sus pruebas. Puede llamar a dicho teléfono de lunes a viernes, entre las 9:00 AM y las 10:00 AM. Para asegurarnos de la confidencialidad de cada paciente, se le pedirá que verifique ciertos datos personales antes de que se le digan los resultados por teléfono. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Para pedir una copia gratis de los resultados de sus pruebas a nuestra Unidad de Archivos Médicos (Medical Records Unit), llene una forma de Entrega de Información, disponible con la recepcionista. Las copias de los resultados de las pruebas estarán disponibles de lunes a viernes, de 9 AM a 11 AM y de 2 PM a 4 PM. Para mantener la confidencialidad de los pacientes, se entregará copia del resultado de las pruebas únicamente si el nombre y la fecha de nacimiento que dio cuando tramitó su inscripción inicial es exactamente idéntica a los que aparecen en su credencial o tarjeta de identificación con foto. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Si perdiera su medicamento, deberá tramitar su inscripción y se le pedirá que pague por la consulta. Los medicamentos no se resurtirán mediante el proceso de pruebas aceleradas o expresas. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

Dada la índole del tema, se aconseja encarecidamente a los pacientes a que no traigan niños consigo cuando vengan a consultas en la clínica. No podrá dejar a los niños en el área de espera sin alguien que los atienda. ( Información sobre la clínica - Preguntas más frecuentes - Maricopa County )

The Medical Certifier has 72 hours from time of death to complete the medical certification of cause of death. However, if the funeral home does not provide the remote attestation to the medical certifier in a timely manner, the medical certifier cannot be held liable if the cause of death has not been completed within the 72 hour time-frame. ( Initiating a Remote Attestation - Maricopa County )

Faxed Remote Attestation (RA) forms are reviewed on a first-come first-serve basis and in most cases, within 30 minutes of faxed receipt during business operating hours. One reason a cause of death may not be entered into VSIMS within this time is if the RA was found into be incomplete and/or needing additional cause of death information. Our office will contact your funeral home and notify you of this situation and update you as to what information is missing. If we are unable to reach you, please also review the comments section of the Decedent’s VSIMS record. Another common reason the cause of death may not yet be recorded in VSIMS is if Maricopa Office of Vital Records is still awaiting the complete Human Remains Release Form (HRRF) from your facility. Please fax the HRRF to our office within 24 hours of removing the Decedent from the place of death. Remember, to ensure that the form is complete and accurate so our office may complete our part of the death registration process. ( Initiating a Remote Attestation - Maricopa County )

At the Maricopa Office of Vital Records, we do our best to respect the beliefs and time sensitive needs of families’ religious practices. We ask your assistance in discussing with your families that the death registration process is a complex, multi-step process that involves the coordination and efforts of several partners. We have learned that if you can inform the medical certifier of the potential urgency in providing timely disposition this gives the certifier more awareness to complete the required medical certification you will need to request a rush disposition transit permit. We have found that this advance notice may assist the certifier with completing the RA quickly and efficiently and most physicians will accommodate the needs of the family and expedite the certification of cause of death, as best possible. Please call the Maricopa County Office of Vital Records Disposition Transit Permit Coordinator at 602-372-0535, ext. 2 so we may be ready to accommodate a potential emergency permit request or advise as suitable. Although we will do our best to accommodate the family’s needs, we cannot guarantee that the cause of death will be sufficient and a disposition transit permit will be issued by the planned date of disposition. Maricopa Office of Vital Records is required by the Arizona Department of Health Services to receive a sufficient cause of death in accordance with national standards and in some cases certified causes of death are required to be reviewed further by the Medical Examiner of the relevant jurisdiction. ( Initiating a Remote Attestation - Maricopa County )

Most audits are scheduled as a result of Internal Audit's annual risk assessment process. On occasion, County leadership may request an audit. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

The frequency of audits usually depends on the level of risk associated with the area. A high-risk area may be audited more frequently than a low-risk area. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

Internal Audit calculates risk by reviewing and analyzing key risk factors, such as: size of budget, number of employees, impact on citizens, time since last audit, results of last audit, changes in management, etc. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

Internal Audit participates in both internal and external quality assurance assessments. Internal assessments include ongoing monitoring of the performance of the internal audit activity and periodic self-assessments. External assessments are done every 5 years or less, and are conducted by a qualified, independent audit team from outside of the organization. The County's independent audit advisory committee oversees this work. A report with findings and recommendations for improvement is issued to the Board of Supervisors. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

The scope of an audit refers to the breadth of the review (how many processes / functions are included). Most audits include an initial planning phase in which the area’s control environment is reviewed at a high level. Areas that appear to have weak controls are selected for audit testing (i.e., included in the audit scope). For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

An audit finding consists of audit results and conclusions based on appropriate analysis and evaluation. The term "observation," "issue" or "exception" may also be used in audit reports. Audit findings may be positive (e.g., "...no duplicate payments were found...") or negative (e.g., "...vendor over-payments were found..."). Findings usually result in recommendations that will assist an area to better achieve its business objectives. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

Most audit reports include the actions an area will take to implement audit recommendations. Action plans usually include target completion dates. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

On a regular basis, Internal Audit determines the status of all open audit recommendations. Follow-up is an important part of the audit process. At the Board of Supervisor's request, Internal Audit prepares an annual report showing all recommendations outstanding for more than 1 year. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

A performance audit is the systematic assessment of a program, function, or operation. A performance audit evaluates economy, efficiency, effectiveness, and compliance. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

When complete, audit reports are usually sent to The Board of Supervisors, the County Manager, the Citizen’s Audit Advisory Committee, the audited area, and other interested parties. Reports are also available to the public on Internal Audit's website. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

The Director of Internal Audit (County Auditor) reports directly to the County Board of Supervisors, with an advisory reporting relationship to the Board-Appointed, Citizens Audit Advisory Committee. For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

The County Board of Supervisors established an Internal Audit department to provide an objective and independent assessment of the County's system of internal controls. This assessment is carried out by Internal Audit through financial, performance, and information systems audits and reviews. Internal Audit evaluates the adequacy of the internal control environment, the operating environment, related accounting, financial, and operational policies, and reports the results accordingly. The Auditor General is an Office of the State of Arizona. It is primarily responsible for an annual audit of the financial statements produced by the County (Comprehensive Annual Financial Report). For more information, please call 602-506-1585. ( Internal Audit - Maricopa County )

An appeal is the way to ask if the juvenile court made a big legal mistake in your case. An appeal is decided by the appeals court. The appeals court will not change your case or give you a chance to re-do your case unless the juvenile court made a big legal mistake in your case. You can read more about it at this FAQ - What is an appeal ( Juvenile Court - Delinquency FAQs - Maricopa County )

An appeal takes a long time: It usually takes half a year or longer. While waiting for an appeal to finish, you still have to do what the judge ordered. For example, if you are sent to Adobe Mountain, you still have to go to Adobe Mountain while waiting for the appeal to finish. If you are ordered pay restitution, you still have to pay. The court will hold the money until the appeal is finished. ( Juvenile Court - Delinquency FAQs - Maricopa County )

We have outlined the process of an appeal in a helpful Guide to How Appeals Work. ( Juvenile Court - Delinquency FAQs - Maricopa County )

You can appeal within 15 days of when your case ends. This means that you have to wait until after adjudication (“conviction” or admission) and disposition (“sentencing”). If you wait longer than 15 days, you cannot appeal. Contact your attorney within 15 days of your disposition hearing and let him or her know you would like to appeal your case. ( Juvenile Court - Delinquency FAQs - Maricopa County )

An attorney requests a mental competency hearing when they believe the client does not understand the juvenile court process or the client is unable to assist the attorney with their defense. Mental competency has nothing to do with how smart a person is. Many juveniles are not competent because they are very young or they have not yet learned about the court system and their constitutional rights in school. ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

A child who is not competent cannot be adjudicated (found guilty) of committing a criminal offense. If a juvenile is unable to understand the juvenile court process or unable to help the attorney with his/her case the charge(s) must be dismissed (dropped). ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

If the court orders mental competency examines, two doctors will be assigned by the court to meet with the juvenile and question the juvenile about the court process to determine whether the juvenile is competent. After meeting with the client each doctor will write a report to the court regarding the juvenile’s competency. The doctor can find the juvenile is: - Competent (understands the court process and can assist the attorney) - Incompetent/restorable (does not understand the court process but with a little tutoring the juvenile will be able to learn the juvenile court process) - Not competent/not restorable (does not understand the court process and will not be able to learn the information in six months) ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

The parents of the juvenile will receive a letter informing them of the dates, times, locations and names of the doctors. The parents are responsible for taking the juvenile to the appointments unless the juvenile is in detention then the doctor will go to detention to see the child. If the parent is unable to make an appointment the doctor must be contacted immediately and the appointment rescheduled. If a juvenile misses an appointment the parents could be assessed the cost of the appointment ($300). ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

After seeing the juvenile and before the next court hearing the doctors will prepare a report to the court informing the judge whether the doctor believes the juvenile is competent, incompetent/ restorable or incompetent/non-restorable. The judge will use this information to determine the juvenile’s competency. The options are: - If the judge finds the juvenile competent the court will set the matter for an adjudication (trial) - If the child is found incompetent/restorable, the child will be placed in restoration - If the child is found incompetent/non-restorable the charges will be dismissed ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

Restoration is a once a week, unless the court orders more frequent sessions, individual tutoring session on the juvenile justice process. Once a week for up to six months the juvenile meets with the restoration specialist at the child’s home or school to receive 50 minutes of tutoring on the court system. Every sixty days the court will hold a review hearing to determine if the child is competent. Prior to the review hearing, the juvenile will be evaluated by a psychologist who will send a report to the court regarding whether the doctor believes the juvenile has become competent. Once the juvenile is competent the court will set the matter for an adjudication (trial) hearing and the case will move forward. If at the end of six months the juvenile is still incompetent and will not understand the juvenile court process even if he receives another two months of lessons, the charges are dismissed, (dropped). ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

If the court finds that the juvenile is competent (able to understand the court process and assist his counsel) the judge will set an adjudication hearing (trial). Prior to the adjudication hearing the attorney will meet with the juvenile to discuss a possible plea offer and prepare for trial. ( Juvenile Court - Mental Competency - Maricopa County )

La influenza comúnmente conocida como la flu es causada por un virus, que infecta el tracto respiratorio (nariz, garganta y pulmones). A diferencia de otras infecciones respiratorias como el resfriado, la influenza causa enfermedades severas y hasta pueden amenazar la vida si se presentan complicaciones. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

La influenza es una enfermedad respiratoria. Los síntomas incluyen fiebre, dolor de cabeza, cansancio extremo, tos seca, garganta adolorida, nariz congestionada, dolor muscular. Los niños pueden sufrir de síntomas gastrointestinales como la nausea, vomito, y diarrea pero estos síntomas no son comunes en los adultos. Aunque cuando se trata de la llamada gripe estomacal que se describe con vomito, nausea, o diarrea estos síntomas son causados por otros virus, bacteria, o posiblemente parasitos y raramente tienen que ver con la influenza. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

En el condado Maricopa la época fuerte de la flu ocurre entre diciembre y marzo. El impacto general a la salud (infecciones, hospitalizaciones y muertes) por la influenza varia de año con año. El departamento de salud pública del condado Maricopa monitorea los virus de la influenza y su actividad. Además provee un reporte semanal empezando en octubre hasta mayo. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

La manera principal en que los virus de la influenza se propagan es de persona a persona cuando se estornuda o suena la nariz infectada. La contaminación ocurre cuando las gotas o deshecho que se arrojo al estornudar viajan hasta tres pies y se depositan en la boca o nariz de otras personas. Aunque menos frecuente, el virus se puede propagar cuando se toca algún deshecho en alguna persona infectada o tocando algún objeto que esa persona toco y luego se toco la boca o la nariz sin lavarse las manos. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

Por lo general, una persona que sufrío de la gripe o influenza pudiera tener algo de inmunidad cuando llegue nuevamente la temporada de gripe. El nivel de protección depende de la salud de la persona. Jóvenes y personas saludables con sistema inmune normal tendrá probablemente un buen sistema de inmunidad contra el mismo tipo de virus del año anterior. Sin embargo, las personas con sistemas inmunes débiles pudiera no ser inmune año con año. Es importante recordar que el virus de la influenza que se usa en la vacuna anual esta constantemente cambiando para que los anticuerpos que se logran no se debiliten con nuevos etapas de virus que se desarrollan constantemente. Además, existen diferentes tipos de virus de influenza y el mismo tipo de virus no necesariamente circula cada año. Por ejemplo, durante el 2005-06 el virus (H3N2) de la influenza predominó, sin embargo la infección del virus de la influenza A (H3N2) no protegerá contra el virus de la influenza B o contra influenza A (H1N1). ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

Si. Algunas de estas complicaciones causadas por la flu incluyen neumonía bacterial, deshidratación, y el empeorar condiciones médicas crónicas como falla del corazón, asma o diabetes. Los niños pudieran padecer de problemas de sinusitis o infecciones de oído todo como complicaciones de la influenza. Aquellos mayores de 65 años o personas con condiciones médicas crónicas presentan más alto riesgo de complicaciones por esta enfermedad. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

Es muy difícil distinguir de la influenza de otras enfermedades respiratorias causadas por virus o bacteria con tan solo tomar en cuentas los síntomas. Una prueba puede confirmar si es influenza si estas dentro de los primeros dos a tres días cuando se presentaron los síntomas. Además, un examen médico puede determinar si una persona tiene otra infección que es el resultado de la influenza. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

Los síntomas se presentarán dentro de uno a cuatro días después de haber estado expuesto, en promedio son dos días. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

El peligro de contagio depende de la edad y la salud de la persona. Los estudios muestran que la mayoría de los adultos saludables pudieran contagiar a otros aun cuando no se han desarrollado los síntomas y hasta cinco días después de que el enfermo presente los síntomas. Algunos niños y personas con sistema inmune débil pueden contagiar a otros hasta después de una semana de haberse enfermado. ( La Gripe - Preguntas Comunes - Maricopa County )

Lead is a toxic metal used in a variety of products and materials, including paint, vinyl mini-blinds, pipes, leaded crystal, dishware, and pottery coatings. When lead is absorbed into the body, it can cause serious damage to vital organs like the brain, kidneys, nerves, and blood cells. Lead poisoning is especially harmful to children under the age of six. Despite laws established in the 1970s to make people aware of the dangers of lead and its poisonous effects, lead poisoning in children remains a common, yet preventable, environmental health problem in the United States. ( Maricopa County Lead Safe Phoenix Partnership - Maricopa County )

Lead interferes with the development and functioning of almost all body organs, particularly the kidneys, red blood cells, and central nervous system. Children under the age of six are especially vulnerable to the dangers of lead poisoning. Lead poisoning can cause: - Brain, liver, and kidney damage - Hearing loss - Learning or behavior problems - Lowered intellect (IQ) - Restlessness - Slowed development Please talk to your health care provider and request a blood lead level test for you or your child if you have any concerns regarding lead poisoning. ( Maricopa County Lead Safe Phoenix Partnership - Maricopa County )

- Headaches - Irritability - Nausea - Stomachaches - Tiredness ( Maricopa County Lead Safe Phoenix Partnership - Maricopa County )

Possible sources of lead contamination:     Old Paint - Lead-based paint is most often found in homes built before 1978.     Lead Dust -  Harmful, invisible dust is created when windows, doors, edges of stairs, rails or other surfaces with lead-based paint wear down from repeated friction, such as opening or closing windows or doors.     Soil - Soil surrounding homes may be contaminated from chipping or flaking exterior lead-based paint.     Drinking Water - Lead pipes in homes before 1930 are likely to contain lead, which is released into drinking water as it passes through the old pipes.     Food - Lead can leach into food or drinks, which are stored in imported ceramic dishes or pottery.     Workplace Exposure - Parents who work in lead-related industries (namely painting, automotive, or recycling industries) or use lead for hobbies (such as for stained glass windows).     Home Remedies - Azarcon, greta, or pay-loo-ah.     Cosmetics - Kohl and Kajal. ( Maricopa County Lead Safe Phoenix Partnership - Maricopa County )

Through nutrition, housekeeping and personal care.   Nutrition  - Serve foods high in iron, calcium and Vitamin C. Adequate intake of these nutrients minimizes lead absorption in children's bodies.   Housekeeping -  Teach and practice healthy home habits, such as hand-washing before eating and sleeping, shoe removal, washing children's toys or other chewable surfaces, purchasing lead-free mini-blinds, and wet mopping and drying floors and surfaces. Hire a certified professional to safely remove lead sources from a home. Make sure children and pregnant women do not stay inside a home when renovations are underway.   Personal Care - Wash your hands and your children's hands frequently, especially before eating and sleeping. Adapted from: The National Lead Information Center : 800-424-LEAD (5323).  ( Maricopa County Lead Safe Phoenix Partnership - Maricopa County )

Help keep Maricopa County beautiful by adopting a county road . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Call MCDOT Customer Service for maps and general information at 602-506-8600. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Contact MCDOT Communications for Media inquiries at 602-506-3342. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Public records requests can be made online. Please visit our Records Requests page . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Report abandoned vehicles to the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office at 602-876-1011. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Obtain an Arizona Driver's License or register your vehicle through the Arizona Department of Transportation's (ADOT) Motor Vehicle Division . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Check with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) for vehicle emissions testing locations. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Contact Maricopa County's Environmental Services Department has a Response Line at 602-506-6616 or visit the website where you can report mosquito problems online. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

Visit MCDOT's project page or contact MCDOT's Communications Branch at 602-506-3342 for road work or project information. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

MCDOT Right of Way permit information and instructions are available on online. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Maricopa County )

MCDOT’s plan approval letters are valid for one year from the approval date. If a permit is not issued within one year, plans must be resubmitted to MCDOT for re-approval. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

All plans involving work on another entity’s or jurisdiction’s utility or facility must be reviewed and approved by that entity or jurisdiction prior to MCDOT’s review. Written proof of approval must be included in your submittal package to MCDOT. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Any water or sewer line project valued at more than $12,500 requires written approval from MCESD prior to review by MCDOT. Water or sewer line projects on the city of Phoenix’s (COP) facilities require written approval from the COP prior to review by MCDOT. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Prior to beginning work, you must submit a Start/Completion Construction Notice to MCDOT. This notice and a traffic control plan (TCP) must be provided at least 24 hours prior to start of work. If the requested traffic control plan is complicated or in a high traffic location, more than 24 hours review time may be required. Check with Permits Customer Service if you have questions regarding longer TCP review times. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Yes, you must submit a completed Start / Completion Construction Notice to a MCDOT Inspector upon completion. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

The permit fee structure is established by the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors. The current fee schedule, available here in step #3 , is incorporated test in Resolution 2001-01. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Permit fees are intended to offset the cost to MCDOT for inspection to assure that the proposed improvements are built to County Standards and observe safety guidelines. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Applicants requesting an extension of their permit will pay a renewal fee equal to 20% of the original permit fee. All permit extensions are at the discretion of the Permits Manager. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

If a permit is cancelled prior to its expiration and no work was performed, you can submit a written request for a permit refund. If approved, MCDOT will refund the permit fee, less the processing fee and 20% of the original permit fee. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

Performance or surety bonds are required for all projects unless the project is being constructed by a public agency with a net worth of more than $1,000,000 as reflected by its most current balance sheet. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

A $2,500 surety bond is required for temporary access. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

It may take up to six weeks after the project has been completed and the permit is closed for the performance or surety bond to be returned. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT - Permits - Maricopa County )

To provide goods or services to Maricopa County, businesses need to register as a vendor . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Contracts - Maricopa County )

To compete for contract work with Maricopa County, businesses need to register as a consultant or contractor . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Contracts - Maricopa County )

All current projects or contracts open for bid and the corresponding bid documents are available to registered consultants and contractors on BidSync . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Contracts - Maricopa County )

Recorded Information: The Plat Index contains all of the surveys, barring any oversights or indexing errors, that were recorded at the Maricopa County Recorder’s office as indexed under the MAP TYPE "Plat" and "Survey" (Book of Plats and Book of Surveys) starting at Book 1 Page 1 for both. Book of Plats: Book 1 Page 1 through current. Book of Surveys: Book 1 Page 1 through Book 3 Page 37 (Which was the last Book of Surveys map recorded. It was recorded on 8-29-1991) In addition, it contains some surveys that were completed on 8½ x 11 that are recorded under the Maricopa Recorders Office document code for corner recorded survey. Unrecorded Information: As of February of 2001, MCDOT has made a concerted effort to index unrecorded surveys donated from private firms or public agencies. The collection is NOT comprehensive, the appropriate firm or agency should always be contacted for additional information. Moreover, the Plat Index may contain some MCDOT, ADOT, SRP, APS or various other agency plans/surveys (i.e. Right of Way, As Builts, etc) but it is NOT a substitute for contacting that agency for information. Information Not in the Plat Index: Book of Roads: Book 1 Page 1 through Book 33 Page 98 (Which was the last Book of Roads map recorded. It was recorded on 4-30-1991) ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

The action to take depends on the MCR Book and Page. Book of Plats 1 through 95; (except 023-18 which appears to be missing) These plats are at the State of Arizona Department of Library, Archives & Public Records. Contact information: Julie Hoff (602) 926-3878 1700 W. Washington Phoenix, AZ 85007 jhoff@lib.az.us Helpful hint: You will probably have to physically go there to retrieve a copy. They do NOT have a full size copier, be prepared to make many 8½ x 11 or legal size prints if you need the whole plat. Book of Plats 75 through current , Book of Surveys and Book of Roads are managed by the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office. Email the Recorders office at copyarea@risc.maricopa.gov and include the following; Your first and last name. Phone number Book and Page Book of Plats 75 through 633 Page 35, and Book of Surveys 1 through 3, and Book of Roads 13 through 33 You will be sent acknowledgment of your request. The original plat will be obtained, re-scanned and a new digital image will be emailed to you. Depending on the time of day, requests are usually fulfilled in one day if not the same day. Thanks for your patience ahead of time. ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Check the report for a column called "Records #". Is there a number in the field? (ex 020048224 which means 02-0048224) If Yes 1) It is a survey that was recorded under a different document code at the recorders office. In other words, it is not in the "Book of Plats or Surveys". Write down the number and go to the recorders site and type it in. If No 2) It is a unrecorded plat or document. At this time, we (MCDOT) are still working out the legal issues on releasing unrecorded third party information. Please contact the Firm/Agency to request a copy of the item. If contact is impossible please contact Brian Dalager for further instructions. ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Although the exact date is not known for sure, it was on or a few days before May 2nd 2001. ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Contact Brian Dalager . ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

The only requirement that we request is very basic knowledge of the Public Land Survey System (PLSS). In other words, the ability to look at a plat and determine which township, range and section(s) it covers. Besides that, you can volunteer for as little or as much time as you would like. The MCDOT's survey section work hours vary during the year however are generally from 6:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Please call one of us (in the following order) to make an appointment: Jerry Shultz (602) 506-4180 Brian Dalager (602) 506-4685 Gregg Hunter (602) 506-4679 ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Unfortunately a good portion of the recorders are missing the following fields. RLS Company Name Project / Job Number There are several reasons for this. We (MCDOT) received a rather large chunk from A Team and Associates (thanks for the contribution!) however they were not indexing those particular fields. From the beginning, we (MCDOT) were not indexing these field as well. Even after we (MCDOT) started to record the fields, in some cases the RLS number is obscured or unreadable. We simply have not taken the time as of yet to go back and do the research required to fill in all the blank fields. FYI Roughly 58% of all the recorders indexed as of 09-25-2003 do NOT have the above fields populated. It is unforseen at this time when it will be accomplished. ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

March 9th, 2009 ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Some recorded plats are not in the database because they simply have little to not land survey value. We have excluded them from the database and they are either in the list below or on the area of the web site "Survey Related Items" then "Maps": MCR Book 11 Page 29 - Map of Nadaburg Irrigation District (1923) MCR Book 13 Page 28 - Map of Nadaburg Irrigation District (1924)  MCR Book 19 Page 39 - Amended Plat of Arizona Water Conservation District (1928)   MCR Book 23 Page 36 - Arizona Water Conservation District (1932) MCR Book 63 Page 29 - Adobe Townsite MCR Book 322 Page 28 - Annexation Plat, City of Goodyear (1988) ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Contact Brian Dalager . ( MCDOT Plat Index - Maricopa County )

Report roadway maintenance requests such as damaged signs or traffic signals and pothole repairs to MCDOT's Roadway Maintenance Division online or by calling 602-506-6063. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

MCDOT does not repair street lights. Please contact your local power company to report issues with street lights. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

Traffic and road closure information for county roads is available online . Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

Yes. Follow us on Twitter for traffic and road closure information. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

AZ511 has traffic and road closure information for state roads and highways. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

Visit our traffic counts page for traffic count data for unincorporated areas within Maricopa County. Return to MCDOT ( MCDOT Roads - Maricopa County )

Any member of our Medical Certification and Disposition Unit may assist you with preparing a Non-Contagious Disease letter. Please call the Disposition Transit Permit Coordinator at 602-372-0535. ( Non-Contagious Disease Letter - Maricopa County )

These letters are signed by one of our Department’s medical directors. This process may take a few days. The Maricopa Office of Vital Registration will notify you when the letter has been signed and is ready for your pick up. ( Non-Contagious Disease Letter - Maricopa County )

You may pick up your Non-Contagious Disease letter after you have been notified that it is ready at our main office, the Central Phoenix location. Find the Central Phoenix location. ( Non-Contagious Disease Letter - Maricopa County )

Click here. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Arizona Revised Statute (A.R.S.) §11-593 requires that the following deaths be reported to the Office of the Medical Examiner: • Death when not under the current care of a health care provider as defined pursuant to section §36-301. • Death resulting from violence. • Unexpected or unexplained death. • Death of a person in a custodial agency as defined in section §13-4401. • Unexpected or unexplained death of an infant or child. • Death occurring in a suspicious, unusual or nonnatural manner, including death from an accident believed to be related to the deceased person's occupation or employment. • Death occurring as a result of anesthetic or surgical procedures. • Death suspected to be caused by a previously unreported or undiagnosed disease that constitutes a threat to public safety. • Death involving unidentifiable bodies. It is up to the medical examiner to determine if a case meets jurisdictional requirements to further investigate and certify the cause and manner of death on the Death Certificate. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Medicolegal death investigations are conducted for the best interest of the public at large and only under the circumstances listed above. Not all investigations require examination of the body or a forensic autopsy. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

If it is determined that the body requires examination, we will make arrangements for transportation to our office at: 701 West Jefferson Street Phoenix, AZ 85007 ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Each case is investigated on a case by case basis. If an examination is needed it will be completed by a medical doctor who specializes in Forensic Pathology. The examination may include an autopsy, an internal examination of the body to help determine facts about the death. An autopsy may be required due to the circumstances surrounding the death and may be necessary to assist in determining cause and manner of death. Exams generally are conducted within 72 hours of the decedent arriving at the Office of the Medical Examiner. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Please make the Medicolegal Death Investigator (MDI) – the Office of the Medical Examiner representative who responds to the scene - aware of any specific requests you have regarding the examination. The Investigations Section also is staffed 24/7 and can be reached at 602-506-1138. The Office of the Medical Examiner will attempt to honor the family’s wishes if possible; however, an internal examination may be required in order to meet our statutory duties and mission. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

If the Medical Examiner has assumed jurisdiction of the Death Certificate, you may request an autopsy. Please make the Medicolegal Death Investigator (MDI) – the Office of the Medical Examiner representative who responds to the scene - aware of any specific questions you have about the death as an autopsy may or may not be the best way to answer them. The Investigations Section also is staffed 24/7 and can be reached at 602-506-1138. The Medical Examiner will attempt to honor your wishes; however, this is not always possible and an autopsy may not be completed on every case, even if requested. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Our procedures do not typically limit the ability to have an open casket viewing. Your funeral service provider will be able to provide the best information about the ability to view once they have received and prepared the body. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

The time of death is documented as the time the decedent is discovered or pronounced dead. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Toxicology is the detection of drugs and/or poisons in biological tissues and is different from hospital drug screening in that it is forensic testing and more rigorous and comprehensive. The Medical Examiner will decide if toxicology testing is necessary; not all cases require testing. Testing can take several months to complete. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

No. In fact, the Office of the Medical Examiner is a forensic medical and laboratory setting and family members are not permitted in these areas. Your family member will be identified through visual comparison to a legal form of identification, by family using photograph(s), or by other forensic means including fingerprints, dental charts, unique identifying marks, or DNA. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

We do not allow viewings at our facility; however, in situations where an immediate family member questions the identification or otherwise wishes to assist in the identification process, that person may make a written or electronic request for an “Identification Meeting” pursuant to A.R.S §11-597.01 (Abby’s Law). Request for an “Identification Meeting” must be made in writing to the Office of the Medical Examiner by an immediate family member. “Immediate family member” is defined in §11-597.01 as a person 18 years of age or older who is the decedent’s: - Spouse - Child - Parent - Grandparent - Grandchild - Sibling - Legal guardian The request may be delivered via mail, in person during normal business hours (8 a.m. - 4 p.m., Monday - Friday), or faxed to 602-372-8696. For additional information on this process please call 602-506-3322. Note: only a photograph for identification can be provided; we do not allow physical viewings. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Your loved one can be released after completion of the examination. To initiate this process, the family needs to contact a service provider (funeral home, mortuary, cremation society, transportation provider), also letting the Office of the Medical Examiner know which provider has been selected. This chosen service provider will contact the Office of the Medical Examiner, on the family’s behalf, to coordinate release. Your service provider also will request certain vital statistic information from the family that must be recorded on the Death Certificate. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

No. Once you have selected a service provider you will need to notify the Office of the Medical Examiner at 602-506-1138. If one is not selected within 72 hours of the examination then a rotation funeral home will be used. The family may be subject to any fees accrued by the rotation funeral home. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Any personal effects obtained by the Office of the Medical Examiner will be released with the body to the selected funeral home/mortuary unless those items are deemed evidence, in which case they will be released to the appropriate law enforcement agency. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Cause and manner of death may be determined the day of the examination. However, further testing or investigation may be required to accurately determine cause and manner of death. You can check cause and manner of death online. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

The length of time required for the completion of reports will vary depending on the agency caseload as well as the complexity, circumstances, and need for additional testing or investigation required for each individual case. In many cases, cause and manner of death are determined the day of the examination. However, further testing or investigation may be required to accurately determine cause and manner of death. In these situations, the death certificate may have a cause of death listed as “Pending”. To provide the most accurate cause and manner of death possible requires a thorough death investigation and this can be a time-intensive process. While we cannot provide an exact closure time for any individual case, 90% of reports are completed within 3 months. If, after 3 months, you have not received your requested report, please contact the office at 602-506-3322 to check the status. Reports are available to the public following completion of the case. If you wish to receive a copy of the report(s), please complete the online Public Records Request form. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

The “pending” death certificate is legal proof of death. Some insurance companies and financial institutions may accept pending death certificates for the purpose of paying benefits or handling other accounts. The Family Advocate is available to assist you with matter. She can be reached at 602-506-3176. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

The Office of the Medical Examiner does not maintain Death Certificates. To obtain a copy of the Death Certificate, you may contact your designated funeral home or mortuary to assist you with this process or you can contact the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, Office of Vital Registration. The Medical Examiner’s portions of the Death Certificate are filled out within 72 hours after the examination, excluding weekends and holidays in compliance with A.R.S. §36-325. In some cases, after examination, a specific cause and/or manner of death is unable to be determined without further laboratory testing or investigation. In those instances the cause and manner of death will be listed as “Pending” and an amendment to the Death Certificate will be filed with the Office of Vital Registration once the death investigation is concluded. For additional information, please call 602-506-6805 or visit the Maricopa County Office of Vital Registration website. ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

When someone suffers a loss, it is not uncommon to feel overwhelmed or like your life is out of control. The Family Advocate can be reached at 602-506-3176. She is available to speak with families, answer questions, and provide emotional support resources, including: • Current case status updates • Liaison assistance with Office of the Medical Examiner and outside agencies • Counseling services and support group referrals • Youth Services referrals • Community information and referral services ( Office of the Medical Examiner FAQs - Maricopa County )

Most OSWTFs include a septic tank, which digests organic matter and separates floatable matter, such as grease and oil, and solids that settle in the tank, from the wastewater. Soil-based systems discharge septic tank effluent (liquids) into a series of perforated pipes or chambers buried in a disposal field or pit designed to slowly release effluent into the soil. Alternative systems may use pumps or gravity to trickle septic tank effluent through sand, organic matter (e.g. peat, sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants, such as disease-causing pathogens, nitrogen, phosphorous, and other contaminants. Some alternative systems are designed to evaporate wastewater or disinfect it prior to discharging it into the soil. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Most system failures are related to inappropriate design and poor maintenance. Soil-based systems (with a drain field) may have been installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables. These conditions can cause hydraulic failures and water resource contamination. Failure to perform routine maintenance can cause solids or greases and oils in the tank to migrate into the drain field and clog the system. The easiest way to ensure the longevity of your septic system is to routinely pump the tank every three to five years, not dump unapproved products into the system, and clean the effluent filter inside the tank every six to twelve months. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

The following items should not be put into the septic disposal system: - Hair Combings - Cleansers - Cigarette Butts - Coffee Grounds - Condoms - Dental Floss - Disposable Diapers - Fat, Grease, Oil - Gauze Bandages - Kitty Litter - Paints - Paper Towels - Pesticides - Photographic Solutions - Sanitary Napkins - Solvents - Tampons - Thinner - Varnishes - Waste Oils Do not dispose of non-biodegradable materials with wastewater through drains and toilets as they displace storage volume of the septic tank and will upset the biological activity occurring in the tank. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

OSWTFs that are properly planned, designed, sized, installed, operated and maintained can provide excellent wastewater treatment. However, systems that are sited in densities that exceed the treatment capacity of regional soils or are poorly designed, installed, operated, or maintained may cause problems. The most-documented problems involve contamination of surface and ground waters with disease-causing pathogens and nitrates. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Yes. Private water well Notice of Intent (NOI) permit applications, for properties up to five acres, are available at our office, through Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR), or through your drilling company. The application must be filled out completely and accurately, including well driller information. All required documents and fees must be submitted to Maricopa County Environmental Services Division. Once the well site inspection is completed, all documents will be forwarded to ADWR for final processing of the well permit. Arizona Department of Water Resources website ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

You and your neighbor must contact the Maricopa County Environmental Services Department to obtain the necessary permits and instructions to install a new system on your own lot. If a lot split occurs and the OSWTF no longer meets any minimum setback requirement, the system must be relocated. Additional inspections, plan reviews and fees may apply. If a lot split had taken place prior to your ownership and the property line now cuts through the existing OSWTF (or the neighbor’s OSWTF), splitting the system between the two lots, the issue then becomes a legal matter. In these cases, it is recommended that you contact legal counsel or your real estate agent to obtain advice on how to rectify the situation. In most cases, each lot will be required to install an OSWTF. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

An alternative system is any type of septic system other than a septic tank using gravity to convey effluent for disposal into trenches, beds, chambers, or pits. Typical alternative systems include aerobic system, cap system, sand lined trench, intermittent sand filter, Wisconsin mound, composting toilet, peat filter, textile filter, pressure distribution, subsurface drip irrigation, and Ruck system. Alternative OSWTFs must be designed by and stamped with the seal of a Professional Engineer (P.E.), registered to work in the state of Arizona and with expertise in the on-site wastewater field. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

See for the current approved list of alternative components allowed in the state of Arizona. These components may be used alone or with other components in an alternative septic disposal system. This list is provided by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). Maricopa County may have additional requirements or restrictions. Approved Proprietary Products (PDF) ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

No. Only an alternative system requires an engineer to properly design, select and lay out the onsite system. Conventional systems may be designed by the homeowner or any other party authorized by the owner provided all requirements listed in the Arizona Aquifer Protection Permit Rule and the Maricopa County Onsite Wastewater guidelines are observed and satisfied. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Yes. All changes must be identified on the newly-submitted, revised site plans with the date of the revision clearly marked on all submittals. Recalculations of the size of the septic system, site plan revisions and additional soils testing may be required, at which time a second plan review must take place before the permit is issued. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Yes. Any proposed changes to the septic system that occur after permit issuance will require an additional plan review. New or revised site plans and/or recalculations must be submitted and approved prior to construction. Additional fees will apply. Undocumented changes observed during the construction inspection will result in costly delays, additional procedures, and, potentially, additional fees. The Maricopa County Environmental Services Division encourages all applicants to spend a little extra time planning the project, keep up to date on any changes that do occur throughout the project, and notify the proper authorities of such changes as soon as possible. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Yes. The same procedure applies as for a construction inspection. You may designate that it is a partial inspection on your requests. Indicate which components of the system are to be inspected. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Leach rock for Onsite Wastewater Treatment Facilities must be cleaned, washed aggregate with a screened diameter of 0.75 to 2.5 inches and a void space of 30%. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

The tank should be installed on a six inch bed of pea gravel or sand to maintain stability. This is required when the tank is installed where jagged or large rocks are present. Access openings on the tank must be brought to within six inches of finished grade. If tanks are installed such that the top of the tank is greater than twelve inches below finished grade, MCESD-approved inspection risers (concrete or dual-wall corrugated polyethylene) are required. Tanks deeper than twenty-four inches are required to have a reinforced lid. The top of the tank shall not be greater than sixty inches below finished grade. Native soil can be used to backfill the tank excavation as long as there are no jagged or large rocks in the mix that could damage the tank during or after backfilling. If jagged or large rocks are present, the soil must be screened to remove the potentially damaging rocks prior to backfilling. The inlet t-baffle and in-line effluent filter at the outlet end of the tank must be easily accessible for maintenance and cleaning. Ensure that the inlet t-baffle can be easily reached and the effluent filter can be pulled up through the smaller inspection port on the top of the tank. If not properly aligned, the larger inspection plugs will need to be removed for routine maintenance. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Distribution boxes (d-boxes) must be level, set on a firm foundation and placed in the correct direction. One opening is one inch higher than the remaining openings; this is the inlet side of the d-box. Attach the inlet end of the d-box to the septic tank by a solid pipe at least two feet in length. Pipes must extend into the d-box one inch and be level, secure, and watertight. Once approval to backfill has been granted, seal the d-box lid so that it is watertight. All connections outside of the disposal field must be watertight. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Disposal field risers shall be brought to within six inches of finished grade or higher. Disposal pipes that are deeper than twenty-four inches will require a minimum of SDR 35 or equivalent pipe. Trench bottoms and disposal pipes must be level. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

If your septic system is not functioning properly, contact a plumbing or septic specialist. If one component of the system (tank or disposal) has failed, an Alteration permit to replace that component will be required. If both the tank and the disposal field have failed, a new Onsite Wastewater Treatment Facility must be installed. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

It may be possible to use the existing septic system with a new house. For more information, view the Minor Plan Review ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

Environmental Services can only release building permits for unincorporated areas. The building permit will be released when the OSWTF is approved for construction. Building permits will be released after plan review has been completed. Construction in incorporated areas may have different requirements. Contact the appropriate building department for more information. ( Onsite Wastewater Systems - Maricopa County )

In the event of an emergency at Palo Verde, plant operators would immediately notify State and Maricopa County emergency officials. These organizations are prepared to respond in accordance with the Palo Verde Offsite Response Plan. If it is necessary to alert the public, the sirens will be sounded. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

If an incident occurs at Palo Verde involving the actual or potential release of radiation into the atmosphere, the Outdoor Warning Siren System within the 10-mile area around the plant will sound for approximately three minutes with a steady, high pitched sound. If you hear the sirens, go indoors immediately and turn on your radio to KTAR (620 AM or 92.3 FM), KMVP (98.7 FM), or other local radio or television stations to hear instructions from government officials. If you hear a siren and do not hear an Emergency Alert System (EAS) message within 10 minutes, call 602-371-7171. A crew will be sent to repair the siren. From time to time you may hear a siren for 5 to 15 seconds. These are called "chirp" and "growl" tests respectively and are part of the siren maintenance program. These tests are performed only during the day and have a low-pitched sound. If you hear one of these tests, there is no need to call the plant. The Federal government requires a full activation of the system annually for testing. Residents within the 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone are notified in advance of this test date. They are also notified of any other maintenance when sirens may be sounded for extended periods of time. 10-Mile Emergency Planning Zone (PDF) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

If you need assistance during an evacuation, please fill out the Assistance Survey (Solicitude de Asistencia) provided by PVGS and return it so we can make arrangements to help before an evacuation is necessary. To download the forms, see the Protective Actions page. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Bring your pets with you when you leave the 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone. Maricopa County Animal Care and Control and the Arizona Humane Society will have temporary shelter available for your use while you are making alternate arrangements. They will be co-located with the Reception and Care Center. For information on livestock, see Radiological Emergency Information for Farmers, Dairy Farmers, Ranchers, Food Processors, and Distributors (PDF) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

When school is in session all the children attending schools within the 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone will be transported to the designated Reunification Center or Reception and Care Center and can be picked up there. Each school has sufficient buses available to evacuate all the children. It is important that you listen to the school telephone messaging and EAS message to see which location has been opened. 10-Mile Emergency Planning Zone (PDF) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

For information on how Palo Verde works, see How the Plant Works (PDF). ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

For information on American Nuclear Insurance, see this brochure (PDF). ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

No. The fuel used in a nuclear plant has very low levels of the type of material that could cause a nuclear explosion. Even so, precautions need to be taken to ensure that radioactive materials do not reach the environment. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

En el caso de una emergencia en Palo Verde, operadores de la planta notificarían inmediatamente a las autoridades de emergencia estatales y del condado de Maricopa. Estas organizaciones están preparadas para responder de acuerdo con el plan de respuesta de Palo Verde. Si es necesario alertar al público, sonarán las sirenas. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Si ocurre un incidente en Palo Verde que implicaba la liberación real o potencial de la radiación a la atmósfera, la advertencia al aire libre sistema de sirenas dentro de la zona de 10 millas alrededor de la planta sonará durante aproximadamente tres minutos con un alto sonido constante, agudo. Si escucha las sirenas, entre a su casa inmediatamente y prenda su radio a KTAR (620 AM o FM 92.3), KMVP (98.7 FM), u otras estaciones de radio o televisión locales para escuchar las instrucciones de los funcionarios del gobierno. Si escucha una sirena y no se oye un mensaje de Sistema de Alerta de Emergencia (EAS) a los 10 minutos, llame al 602-371-7171. Un equipo será enviado a reparar la sirena. De vez en cuando es posible que escuche una sirena durante 5 a 15 segundos. Estos se llaman "chirrido" y pruebas de "gruñido", respectivamente, y son parte del programa de mantenimiento de sirena. Estas pruebas se llevan a cabo sólo durante el día y tienen un sonido de tono bajo. Si escucha una de estas pruebas, no hay necesidad de llamar a la planta. El gobierno federal requiere una activación completa del sistema al año para la prueba. Residentes dentro de la Zona de Planificación de Emergencia de 10 millas se les comunicará con anticipación de esta fecha de la prueba. También son notificados de cualquier otro tipo de mantenimiento cuando las sirenas puedan sonar durante largos períodos de tiempo. Zona de Planificación de Emergencia de 10 millas (PDF en Inglés) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Si necesita asistencia durante una evacuación, por favor llene la Encuesta de Asistencia (Solicitude de Asistencia) proporcionada por PVGS y devolverlo para que podamos hacer arreglos para ayudar antes de que sea necesario una evacuación. Para descargar los formularios, consulte la página protectora acciones. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Lleve a sus mascotas con usted cuando salga de la Zona de Planificación de Emergencia de 10 millas. Condado de Maricopa Cuidado y Control de Animales y la Sociedad Protectora de Animales de Arizona tendrán refugios temporales disponibles para su uso mientras se están haciendo arreglos alternativos. Ellos serán co-localizados con la recepción y Centro de atención. Para obtener información sobre el ganado, consulte Información Radiológica de Emergencia para los agricultores, productores de leche, ganaderos, procesadores de alimentos y Distribuidores (PDF en Inglés) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Cuando la escuela está en sesión, todos los niños que asisten a las escuelas dentro de la Zona de Planificación de Emergencia de 10 millas serán transportados al Centro de Reunificación designado o al Centro de Recepción y Atención y pueden ser recogidos allí. Cada escuela tiene suficientes autobuses disponibles para evacuar a todos los niños. Es importante que escuche los mensajes telefónicos de la escuela y el mensaje EAS para ver qué ubicación se ha abierto. 10-Mile Emergency Planning Zone (PDF en Inglés) ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Para obtener información sobre cómo funciona Palo Verde, vea Cómo funciona la planta (PDF en Inglés). ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Para obtener información sobre el seguro nuclear estadounidense, consulte este folleto (PDF en Inglés). ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

No. El combustible utilizado en una planta nuclear tiene niveles muy bajos del tipo de material que podría causar una explosión nuclear. Aun así, las precauciones deben tomarse para asegurar que los materiales radiactivos no llegan al medio ambiente. ( Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station - Maricopa County )

Permits are required in all county zoning districts. There is no category of zoning called “agricultural” – agricultural uses are allowed in the “Rural” zoning districts. Agricultural uses are allowed in any zoning district with an Agricultural Exemption. Please call 602-506-3301 for more information. ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

The approved land use file must contain representation (on a site plan) of the improvements which qualify as exempt. Those that do qualify will not be required to get permits from Planning and Development.    However, improvements which are not incidental to the exempted use require permits and must meet applicable regulations. land use . ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

It may qualify, but minimum requirements have to be met. An application for an agricultural exemption must be processed and approved after obtaining approval from the Maricopa County Assessor’s Office with an Agricultural Status. An agricultural exemption certificate may then be issued. This exemption certificate authorizes the approved use of the property to be exempt from the County Building Codes, Zoning Ordinance, and Drainage Regulations. However, other regulatory agencies such as Flood Control & Environmental Services still have the authority to regulate. ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

The land use application for an agricultural exemption certificate is available on the Planning & Development website. Select the “Information Packet & Application” on the Agricultural Exemption page . Agricultural Exemption page . ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

To qualify for an agricultural exemption, the property must be a minimum of 5 contiguous commercial acres (175,000 square feet). More than one parcel is acceptable as long as they are contiguous. It must have an agricultural use classification assigned by the County Assessor's Office. To receive this, an application to the Assessor's Office is required and the use must qualify to be exempt as per the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance. You may then request an Agricultural Exemption Certificate to be issued by the Planning and Development Department. planning and development on their landing page. ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

The Zoning Ordinances states: This Ordinance shall not prevent, restrict or otherwise regulate the use or occupation of land or improvements for railroad, mining, metallurgical, grazing or general agricultural purposes, if the tract/s concerned is/are 5 or more contiguous commercial acres in size (Note: 1 Commercial acre = 35,000 square feet). 1. Property is not exempt from the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance and/or Building Safety Ordinance unless and until the Maricopa Planning and Development Department has issued a certificate of exemption for that property. In order to secure a certificate of exemption, an applicant shall submit a zoning clearance application, including site plan and other reasonable supporting documentation. 2. Only property classified by the Maricopa County Assessor’s Office or the Arizona Department of Revenue as property used for one of the purposes enumerated in the first paragraph of this section is eligible for exemption under this section. If property has been so classified, the property is exempt from the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance and/or Building Safety Ordinance, unless the Planning and Development Director independently determines that all or part of the property is not used primarily for one or more of the purposes enumerated in the first paragraph of this section. 3. Any structures built under an exemption that do not meet the underlying zoning district and/or Building Safety Ordinance standards may be required to comply with said standards if, at a future date, the exemption is no longer applicable. ( Planning & Development - Agricultural Exemption - Maricopa County )

The Zoning Ordinance does not contain a definition for a “church,” although a “church” is included in the definition of “Places of Public Assembly.” A standard dictionary definition is acceptable; Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate dictionary defines “church” as “a building for public and especially Christian worship.” ( Planning & Development - Commercial - Maricopa County )

Churches are permitted in rural and residential zoning districts as well as the C-1, C-2 and C-3 zoning districts. ( Planning & Development - Commercial - Maricopa County )

Private schools with a curriculum customarily given in public schools, which applies to most church schools, are permitted in any zoning district where a public school is permitted. This includes any rural or residential zoning district and the C-1, C-2, or C-3 zoning districts. ( Planning & Development - Commercial - Maricopa County )

Yes. Community Residences fall into 2 categories in the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance:  1. Community Residences providing care for no more than 10 non-adjudicated patient residents (including live-in staff) are allowed in all zoning districts except for the C-O & C-S zoning districts. Community Residences are subject to conditions including a minimum a separation of 1200 feet and licensure or other certification requirements.    2. Homes providing care for more than 10 residents require a Special Use Permit or a Reasonable Accommodation.   The County will not reserve future properties for Community Residences, all applications are based upon a first come, first serve basis. Previous approvals may be revoked if the use is discontinued.  New ownership or a new type of Community Residence requires a new Community Residence Application. ( Planning & Development - Community Residences / Recovery Community - Maricopa County )

The applicant of a Community Residence is responsible for submitting a Community Residence Application that meets zoning ordinance and Staff application requirements. If approved, Staff will produce a Staff Report which will document approval of the land use.  The Staff Report is the only documentation that you will receive for land use approval.  After the applicant has received an approved staff report, the applicant is then responsible for applying for either a compliance inspection or residential alteration permit. Both permits require additional documentation separate from the Community Residence Application.  Following an inspection, a Certificate of Occupancy may be obtained. You may then submit both the Staff Report and Certificate of Occupancy to the State.  County Staff will not produce any other documentation such as letters or e-mails so that licensure may be obtained. ( Planning & Development - Community Residences / Recovery Community - Maricopa County )

These facilities are not a category of Community Residences. They may be permitted via a Special Use Permit. ( Planning & Development - Community Residences / Recovery Community - Maricopa County )

Yes, a compliance inspection is part of the process. For existing single family homes, residential building codes apply. If the home plans to have more than five residents, a fire sprinkler system is required. In the case of a new build community residence, the building code definition of a community residence applies. This requires the home to meet commercial group home building safety codes. Community Residences for more than 10 persons are subject to an Institutional Occupancy classification. ( Planning & Development - Community Residences / Recovery Community - Maricopa County )

A Compliance Inspection is a development permit issued to enable one inspection on one property. This type of permit is only used in specific circumstances. A Compliance Inspection does not authorize work; rather, it provides for a property inspection so the inspector may better assist a customer with the next step in the completion of their project. ( Planning & Development - Compliance / Special Inspection - Maricopa County )

There are 5 instances where a compliance inspection is appropriate: 1. Final Inspection: This is used when a permit had been previously issued, passed all required inspections, except the Final(s), and has since expired. This is a one-time inspection and could be for a Final Building Inspection, a Final Drainage Inspection, or both. If both are necessary, then 2 Compliance Inspections are required with separate fees. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied. If denied, a new permit may be required. 2. Fire Damage: One-time inspection where an inspector views the property and structures to determine the extent of the fire damage. Result: A field report is prepared and the customer is advised of the type of permit(s) required. 3. Group Home: An inspection of an existing residential structure to ensure all requirements are met for occupancy as a group home with less than 5 occupants. A proper site plan, floor plan and Land Use Certificate application must be submitted for review. Due to the complexity, this permit is not issued over the Counter. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied. 4. Code Compliance: An inspection of a building or structure to determine if it is in compliance with all county building codes. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied. 5. Move On Structure: An inspection to ensure an existing structure intended to be moved into the County jurisdiction meets all structural requirements. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied. ( Planning & Development - Compliance / Special Inspection - Maricopa County )

In the five scenarios listed above, a Compliance Inspection is needed to have a Maricopa County Inspector advise you on the specific actions required for the completion of your project. This will help ensure; protection of your investment, protection for you and your family, protection of the public and future residents, and protection of the environment. ( Planning & Development - Compliance / Special Inspection - Maricopa County )

To request a Compliance Inspection, complete a building application and Contact Supplemental form; be sure to identify the type of Compliance Inspection you need. List any prior permits you may have, if applicable. The permit fee is $100 per Compliance Inspection, and there is also a $10 Address Verification. For a Compliance for Final, a compliance request form and compliance application is required. A review is conducted to see if the expired permit or work qualifies for a Compliance permit. Once approved, you will be notified to pay the fee(s) and the permit will be emailed to you with instructions. Be sure to post this permit at the work site and call for the inspection. You may retrieve these forms at our office location or online for your residential or commercial project: Building Services page . Building Services page. ( Planning & Development - Compliance / Special Inspection - Maricopa County )

If the property is located in the Unincorporated Areas of Maricopa County, you can call the Flood Control District’s Floodplain Division at 602-506-2419 and ask for floodplain determination. Prior to calling make sure you have the Tax Assessor Number. You may also check the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Flood Insurance Maps Flood Insurance Maps. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

Whether a site inspection is needed or not depends on the location of the site and if the Engineering Division already has drainage information for the site. The Engineering Division Representative will determine if a site inspection is needed at the time of the plan submittal. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

Yes, in most instances. Check the Drainage Matrix page Drainage Matrix page. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

A Drainage Clearance is issued as part of the Building Permitting process. A site plan has to be submitted to the Maricopa County Planning and Development Department. The Plan is taken in and a decision is made whether a site investigation is required. If not, then the plan is either issued over the counter or sent to Engineering for further review. If a site investigation is required, the applicant is told to stake the property corners of the building location and call for the site inspection. Once the inspection is performed, the decision is made as to whether an engineer needs to be retained to provide hydrology and/or hydraulic information, or are we able to issue the Drainage Clearance only based upon minimal information such as drainage arrows and cross-sections. Once the final plans are prepared and sent to the Engineering Division for review and, if all of the requirements are met, they are approved. When all of the reviewing agencies are satisfied that the plan meets their requirements, a Drainage Clearance is issued as part of the County’s Permitting Process. For further information call 602-506-3301. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

Call the Maricopa County Planning and Development at 602-506-3301. Be prepared to provide as much detail as possible, including the address or parcel number involved and a description of the suspected violation. If you choose to provide your name and phone number, efforts will be made to keep that information confidential. You may also report a violation online . ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

The location of the structure in proximity to a wash is dependent on the size of the wash, the amount of flow the wash carries, and if any bank stabilization is required. The Engineering Plan Reviewer will determine if a location is acceptable during the plan review. In general, stay away from all major washes. A good rule for proposed structures within twenty feet would be to provide bank protection and set the footers below the bottom elevation of the wash. For larger washes, a civil engineer will need to determine appropriate erosion control. Erosion control may need to meet Arizona State Standard 5-96. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

To know what needs to be shown, please review the section regarding Plan Submittal Requirements on the Drainage Review page . Drainage Review page. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

After everything has been completed, all the concrete has been poured, all trenches have been filled, stockpiles/berms removed and the site has been rough graded. Call our inspection line at 602-506-3629. Inspections for the next day need to be called in prior to 2:30 p.m. (This is an automated system). You can also request an inspection online. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

Prior to pouring the stem walls, you must call for a stem inspection. Have the contractor set up the height of the stem walls for our inspector’s site visit. This should happen after the initial site plan has been approved. Call our inspection line at 602-506-3629. Inspections for the next day need to be called in prior to 2:30 p.m. (This is an automated system). You can also request an inspection online. request an inspection online. ( Planning & Development - Drainage - Maricopa County )

There are 2 types of home occupation definitions in the Zoning Ordinance: 1. Residential home occupations, which are allowed as an accessory use in any rural or residential zoning district, subject to the conditions outlined in the Use Regulations of Chapters 5 and 6 of the Ordinance. Garage/yard sales or home parties that are held for the sale of goods or services are not considered a home occupation, provided these sales do not exceed 6 days in one year. 2. Cottage industries are permitted in rural and residential zoning districts, subject to obtaining a Special Use Permit approved by the Board of Supervisors (as outlined in Chapter 13 of the Ordinance). ( Planning & Development - Home Occupation - Maricopa County )

The Zoning Ordinance does not list businesses (i.e. commercial activity) as a permitted primary use in rural or residential districts; however, many accessory commercial businesses can be permitted under the residential home occupation definition or the cottage industry definition assuming the required standards dealing with the level of activity and effects on surrounding properties are adhered to. ( Planning & Development - Home Occupation - Maricopa County )

First, nonconforming means that the subject does not conform to current regulations; and therefore, is in violation of those regulations. In order to qualify as legal and still be nonconforming, the situation which does not meet current regulation must have lawfully existed before those regulations were effective. Once qualified, a legal nonconforming (grandfathered) situation exists. ( Planning & Development - Legal Non-Conforming - Maricopa County )

Any building or structure in existence on a lot as of January 1, 2000 is considered legal nonconforming and will not be required to obtain a construction permit unless there is an observable defect or public safety concern. ( Planning & Development - Legal Non-Conforming - Maricopa County )

The zoning district in which the property is located determines what uses are allowed on the parcel. A situation where the current use of that property or building(s) does not conform with the zoning, but has been an ongoing use (without an interruption of 12 months or more) since before the zoning regulations took effect on May 29, 1969, may qualify as a legal nonconforming use. ( Planning & Development - Legal Non-Conforming - Maricopa County )

Staff researches legal nonconforming files located in the department to verify or find information on the use on the property. If we have no previous record or substantiation, the owner is required to provide independent third party documentation that the use is legal nonconforming. A site plan, indicating all uses and structures with setbacks, is also required. The information, when submitted and determined adequate, is retained in files and sorted by Assessor Parcel Number. ( Planning & Development - Legal Non-Conforming - Maricopa County )

A public record must be documented and the burden of proof falls mostly to the applicant. A land use submittal for a Legal Nonconforming determination is required. For more information, access the Information packet and application (pdf). Information Packet and Application (PDF). ( Planning & Development - Legal Non-Conforming - Maricopa County )

Any rural or residential lot in the unincorporated area of the county may be issued a development permit for the placement of one single-wide or multi-sectional manufactured home built after June 15, 1976. The unit must be on a permanent foundation system, which means either on a slab/stem wall foundation or on a state approved system. Re-roofing, re-siding and structural additions must conform to the Maricopa County Comprehensive Building Code. Manufactured homes are also permitted in a mobile home park. ( Planning & Development - Manufactured Housing - Maricopa County )

Mobile Home Parks are allowed in the R-5 Multiple Family Residential Zoning Districts and must adhere to the standards outlined in Section 1203 of the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinancy (PDF) . Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance (PDF). ( Planning & Development - Manufactured Housing - Maricopa County )

A multi-sectional manufactured home can be placed in any location in which a site-built home is permitted. A single wide mobile home can also be placed in any location in which a site-built home is permitted, in a mobile home subdivision, or in a mobile home park. All that is needed is a development permit. ( Planning & Development - Manufactured Housing - Maricopa County )

Contact the State Office by visiting the Arizona Department of Fire, Building and Life Safety website . Fire, Building and Life Safety website. ( Planning & Development - Manufactured Housing - Maricopa County )

Once a permit is obtained and a final inspection has been performed, the inspector will direct staff to contact the servicing utility company with a clearance number to initiate this process. ( Planning & Development - Manufactured Housing - Maricopa County )

The online process follows the same path as paper submittals. The advantage of the online process is convenience for our customers by not having to make the trip into the office, and by not needing to print plans for review. Only one set of each required document is needed for uploading into the online software, currently ProjectDox. The turnaround times for plan review are the same as for paper submittals.    View our permitting page.   ( Planning & Development - Permits - Maricopa County )

The Fast Track program offers a more expedient review process for many simple projects. Those projects are ones that have no dominant zoning, environmental, drainage or floodplain concerns and can be processed the same day while customers wait or return to the office later the same day. If a project would have originally been Fast Track eligible, modifications are also accepted with certain restrictions. Please inquire at time of submittal. ( Planning & Development - Permits - Maricopa County )

Learn how to obtain a building permit and how to submit any plans on our informational resources page. ( Planning & Development - Permits - Maricopa County )

A Plan of Development (POD) is a site plan which describes how a parcel of land is proposed to be improved. It includes outlines of all structures and site improvements, including but not limited to: - Property lines - Setbacks - Driveways - Landscaping - Existing structures - Proposed structures - Utility connections Typically, a POD does not involve any entitlements – that is, there is no requirement to obtain additional approvals for the type of development proposed (i.e., zoning, variance, etc.). The POD review focuses on reviewing the entire project layout for basic design and compatibility and to ensure that a project meets applicable regulations and policies. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Often the term plan of development and site plan are used interchangeably. However, in the case of a POD, the site plan must convey the conditions that will ultimately exist at build-out, whereas the site plan submitted for building or construction permits may only consider existing structures and those contemplated by the particular permit. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

A POD is required for all non-residential zoning districts, 2-family and multi-family developments, and all sites with a Unit Plan of Development (UPD), and Planned Area Development (PAD). ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Yes. For any existing 2-family, multi-family, or commercial developments, an as-built POD (subject to certain conditions and to a zoning clearance review and fee) will be allowed for any development existing prior to September 22, 2008. Industrial developments have a similar allowance, but are subject to the existing effective date of October 15, 1984. An as-built POD is processed via a land use application, with the average process time of 2 to 3 weeks. For proposals on existing 2-family, multi-family, or commercial developments involving internal tenant improvements, additional wall signs, and other non-layout changes or minor permits, only building permits will be required. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Effective September 22, 2008, PODs are processed administratively by staff. Because this office has no control over the quality of submittals, nor the number of resubmittals required, or the time it takes an applicant to make such resubmittal(s), the average processing timeframe is 90 days. Additionally, a number of reasons could require the POD to be forwarded to the Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Supervisors for review or appeal by either staff or the applicant, which may increase the time. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Yes. A POD may be processed through the Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Supervisors concurrent with a Zone Change request (under the Zone Change application) or it may be processed administratively (under a separate POD application). All Zone Change requests that require a POD will be charged as a Zone Change with Overlay and a separate POD request will be charged accordingly. Therefore, if a Zone Change and POD are processed under 1 application at the same time, there is a financial savings. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Amendments to existing PODs may be processed administratively via a Major or Minor Amendment process if they do not change or alter the Board of Supervisors’ approved development standard or stipulation of approval. The main difference between a major and minor proposal is in scope of work proposed and required fees. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

Yes. POD approvals are valid for 2 years, with a possible extension of 1 additional year. The POD approval will essentially “vest” with issuance of a building or construction permit. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

No, however it is recommended. Pre-Application meetings are attended by representatives from Planning, Drainage review, Zoning review, Transportation, Environmental Services, and Flood Control. If the POD is submitted in conjunction with a request for a Zone Change, a pre-application meeting is required. ( Planning & Development - Plan of Development - Maricopa County )

To learn the history, review our Permit Research options to see if there are any violations, expired and current permits, etc. on the property. If there is an available history of the property, there may be a zoning case, SUP, LU, etc. on the property. For more information, you may also view the  PlanNet page ( Planning & Development - Property History - Maricopa County )

If you need to request any documentation that may assist you as new buyers, visit our public records page . ( Planning & Development - Property History - Maricopa County )

Our online database is not comprehensive and does not account for all local variations in gradient change which may meet the hillside definition: slope of 15% or greater within any 5 foot elevation change (See MCZO Section 1201). For an accurate picture of a particular lot, please consult with a registered land surveyor.  You may view our online planning tool, PlanNet . ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Building permits are required for all structures with the exception of a structure that is less than 200 square feet with no electrical, plumbing or mechanical. After speaking with your neighbor, if you feel a violation of the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance exists, you may submit an  online code compliance violation complaint. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Maricopa County Planning and Development has no records of easements on individual lots that are not part of a recorded subdivision; a surveyor, real estate attorney, or a “schedule B” from a title company may be able to assist you with the location of easements. Recorded subdivisions may have easement information listed as part of the recorded plat. You may also research the county recorder office. county recorder office. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

If you believe there has been a violation on a neighboring property, please contact the Code Compliance Team to report the issue. For an overview of the Code Compliance process, and the option of submitting a complaint online, view the reporting a complaint page. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

All fencing over 1 foot in height requires a permit from the Planning and Development Departments. Fencing is classified as a “B-fence” requiring building and zoning clearances if it is located on a vacant property; serves as a pool barrier; is over 8 feet in height; is located on a hillside property; or retains soils (retaining wall). All other fencing would be classified as “D-fencing” and requires a drainage clearance. For more information, visit our Residential Construction page. Residential Construction page. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Fencing or structures should not cross an ingress/egress easement. The Planning and Development Department does not prohibit fencing or structures located in an ingress/egress easement, but relies on the customer to provide accurate information on the documents submitted for a permit. The Planning and Development Department is not involved with ingress/egress easement conflict as this is a civil concern and must be resolved as such. If you believe there has been a violation on a neighboring property, please contact the Code Compliance Team to report the issue. For an overview of the Code Compliance process, and the option of submitting a complaint online, view the reporting a complaint page. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Please read more about how to split (or combine) parcels of land on our informational Splitting Property page. Splitting Property page. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Learn more about the companies that provide service on our utility services page. utility services page. ( Planning & Development - Property Research - Maricopa County )

Section 202 of the Zoning Ordinance defines an accessory building as: “A building or manufactured/mobile home which is subordinate to and the use of which is incidental to that of the principal building or use on the same lot." ( Planning & Development - Residential - Maricopa County )

The first criteria is that a lot must have a permitted primary use established (usually a dwelling unit). Next, the proposed accessory building must be clearly incidental to the established primary use (e.g. detached garage, home workshop, etc.). ( Planning & Development - Residential - Maricopa County )

On any lot, an accessory building can be located at any location that the primary building can be located. In addition to the regular location standards, detached accessory buildings are permitted to be constructed/placed at a minimum 3 foot setback in any location other than the required front yard. Accessory buildings cannot occupy more than 30 percent of the required rear yard or side yard. Finally, if the detached accessory building is a garage entering an alley, it must be a minimum of 10 feet from the alley line. ( Planning & Development - Residential - Maricopa County )

At the time a building permit is being obtained, construction power must be requested. If construction surpasses the rough topout state, construction power will not be issued. Temporary construction power may be secured for a residence at the time of permit application for the residence by mentioning to the building safety counter person that temporary construction power is needed. Once the building permit for the residence is issued, should the applicant need construction power, a “field change” may be issued by the building inspector. In either case, the applicant will receive instruction on setting up a temporary construction service and will be given the appropriate forms to fill out and sign. Temporary construction power for a business is left up to the discretion of the building inspector, since he or she will be more familiar with the project. ( Planning & Development - Residential - Maricopa County )

At the time a building permit is being obtained, construction power must be requested. If construction surpasses the rough topout state, construction power will not be issued. Temporary construction power may be secured for a residence at the time of permit application for the residence by mentioning to the building safety counter person that temporary construction power is needed. Once the building permit for the residence is issued, should the applicant need construction power, a “field change” may be issued by the building inspector. In either case, the applicant will receive instructions on setting up a temporary construction service and will be given the appropriate forms to fill out and sign. Temporary construction power for a business is left up to the discretion of the building inspector, since he/she will be more familiar with the project. ( Planning & Development - Temporary Power - Maricopa County )

Certain uses are not allowed on a property but may be necessary or desirable for a limited period of time and these uses can be carefully regulated through the issuance of a Temporary Use Permit. ( Planning & Development - Temporary Use - Maricopa County )

The uses are determined by the Zoning Inspector; typical uses include: - Temporary Housing - Caretaker’s Quarters - Temporary Events - Temporary Seasonal Sales - Underage Occupancy - Off-Site Construction Yard - Temporary Model Home Sales Complex ( Planning & Development - Temporary Use - Maricopa County )

Yes, for up to 2 years if the owner is constructing or reconstructing a permanent residence on the site and the building permit for the permanent residence remains active. The Ordinance also has allowance for emergency housing. An example of emergency housing is temporary shelter for persons displaced by fire, flood, etc. ( Planning & Development - Temporary Use - Maricopa County )

Yes, with a statement from their physician. The Temporary Use Permit for the caretaker’s quarters must be renewed annually. The additional residence shall not be permanent in nature and must be removed once the need is no longer valid or necessary. ( Planning & Development - Temporary Use - Maricopa County )

It depends on the specifics of the event and how large it may be, but generally yes, this permit is needed for a weekend or seasonal event. A Temporary Use Permit may be approved for temporary/special events limited to 30 event days within a 6 month period. ( Planning & Development - Temporary Use - Maricopa County )

You will be provided an opportunity to present your case to the Board at a hearing. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

Staff cannot answer that question since the Board is responsible for the final determination. If you do not agree with the Board’s decision, you have the right to file an appeal with the Maricopa County Superior Court within 30 days of the Board’s decision. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

Typically 1 to 2 months if all the information is correct and revisions are not required. There are exceptions for hillside variances, drainage review, interpretations, and complex requests. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

A pre-application meeting is highly recommended for variance requests. This allows the property and staff to evaluate the request(s) and to provide information on the variance application process. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

For more information on the individuals or boards to contact, Planning and Development has made available a Pre-Application Meeting Packet (PDF). Pre-Application Meeting Packet (PDF). ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

Yes, based upon the following: Residential with violation $150, Residential without violation $50. The Pre-Application Meeting packet includes the fee schedule and the application materials required for submittal. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )

Deviations to the Zoning Ordinance with regard to applicable zoning standards (i.e. yard setbacks, lot coverage, lot area or width, etc.), hillside and drainage regulations, interpretations of the meaning of a word or phrase in the zoning ordinance, code compliance reviews, appeal of determinations and some temporary use permit requests. ( Planning & Development - Variance Cases / Meetings - Maricopa County )